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I found something inside .NET that works a bit differently that I would have expected. The code I am pasting won't make sense, but it is a condensed version of a much more complicated function I have. I'm essentially getting the anonymous type information as a parameter (no instance created yet of the anonymous type) and I need to create a list of that type, populate it, and then return the list. Now, I found a solution, but I wanted to know why Method B works but not Method A.

Method A:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var newItem = new {  ID = Guid.NewGuid(), Name = "Test" };
    dynamic list;

    list = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(newItem.GetType()));

    list.Add(newItem);
    list.Add(Activator.CreateInstance(newItem.GetType(), new object[] { Guid.NewGuid(), "Test 2" }));
}

Method B:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var newItem = new {  ID = Guid.NewGuid(), Name = "Test" };
    System.Collections.IList list;

    list = (System.Collections.IList)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(newItem.GetType()));

    list.Add(newItem);
    list.Add(Activator.CreateInstance(newItem.GetType(), new object[] { Guid.NewGuid(), "Test 2" }));
}

Again, I'm not looking for a solution, just curious why Method B works but not Method A.

Thanks!

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Why do you want to use dynamic in that scenario? You are creating a generic List. You also aren't saying what error or alert you are receiving, might be relevant. –  Lazarus Feb 4 '11 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because in your method B, you are using the explicit IList.Add(object) which takes an object and tries to cast it to your anonymous type. In method A you have a List<anonymous type> and you're using the generic Add method and trying to Add an object, but you get the RuntimeBinderException because it is expecting the correctly casted type. If you weren't using a dynamic you'd see the compiler error. To use the explicit IList.Add, change your method A with

((IList)list).Add(
    Activator.CreateInstance(newItem.GetType(), 
        new object[] { Guid.NewGuid(), "Test 2" }));
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Ah! It all makes sense now. Thanks for the help! Again, I'm using method B since it is a much cleaner solution, and this helps clear up why Method A didn't work in the first place. –  Terry Feb 4 '11 at 16:58
    
Sure enough, if I create a function: T Cast<T>(T sampleItem, object item) { return (T)item; } and then call list.Add(Cast(newItem, Activator.CreateInstance(newItem.GetType(), new object[] { Guid.NewGuid(), "Test 2" }))); it works just fine. Thanks again! –  Terry Feb 4 '11 at 18:45

All you need to do to make Method A work, is dynamic cast the Activator result that you are adding. Many people don't realize that C# dynamic invocation actually uses static types by default to determine the method signature. So by casting the argument to dynamic as well you are telling it to use the runtime type.

   static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var newItem = new {  ID = Guid.NewGuid(), Name = "Test" };
    dynamic list;

    list = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(newItem.GetType()));

    list.Add(newItem);
    list.Add((dynamic)Activator.CreateInstance(newItem.GetType(), new object[] { Guid.NewGuid(), "Test 2" }));

}
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