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I'm using a modified version of the Eventually workflow from the F# spec for my development on Xbox. The .net framework on the Xbox does not support tail calls, it seems. Because of this, I have to disable tail call optimization when compiling.

Although it might seem at first that this restriction would prevent the use of any form of looping in computation expressions, I initially thought that "stepping" would avoid that problem: A recursive function f in the computation expression does not call itself directly, instead it returns an Eventually value containing a lambda which calls f.

Experiments indicate that I was right about while loops (they don't cause stack overflows when used in computation expressions), but not about recursive functions.

To clarify, this works:

// Wait until "start" or "A" is pressed on one of the gamepads.
// Set "player" when that happens.
let player : PlayerIndex option ref = ref None
while (!player).IsNone do
    for p in all_players do
        let state = GamePad.GetState(p)
        if state.IsConnected
            && (state.Buttons.Start = ButtonState.Pressed
                || state.Buttons.A = ButtonState.Pressed) then
            player := Some p
    do! sys.WaitNextFrame()

This causes a stack overflow:

// Wait until "start" is pressed on the controlling gamepad.
let rec wait() = task {
    input.Update()
    if not (input.IsStartPressed()) then
        do! sys.WaitNextFrame()
        do! wait()
}

In the second case, the stack trace shows a long sequence of calls to "bind@17-1", whose code is shown below. The line number appearing in the stack trace is line 17.

let rec bind k e =
    match e with
    | Completed r ->
        Running(fun () -> k r)
    | Running f ->
        Running(fun () -> f() |> bind k)  // line 17
    | Blocked(dt, f) ->
        Blocked(dt, fun () -> f() |> bind k)
    | BlockedNextFrame f ->
        BlockedNextFrame(fun () -> f() |> bind k)
    | Yield f ->
        Yield(fun () -> f() |> bind k)

Where am I wrong? Is my reasoning about "steppable recursion" being harmless w.r.t. stack overflows incorrect? Is there something wrong with my implementation of bind?

Oh my head! Continuation-passing with recursion gives me headaches...

EDIT: "steppable recursion being harmless w.r.t. stack overflows" has got a name, I have just learned. It's called a trampoline.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

replace the last do! with return!:

// Wait until "start" is pressed on the controlling gamepad.
let rec wait() = task {
    input.Update()
    if not (input.IsStartPressed()) then
       do! sys.WaitNextFrame()
       return! wait()
}

EDIT

according to F# spec, do! wait() will be transformed to Bind(wait(), fun() -> Zero()), so every recursive call will increase level of Bind nesting (as you see in stacktrace)

in opposite return! wait() will immediately return new 'Eventually' computation that can be consumed on the next step.

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1  
Thanks, that's working! Now if only I understood why... Has it something to do with the fact that the do! wait() in my code was implicitly followed by return()? –  Joh Feb 4 '11 at 17:44

One way to understand what's happening is to look at the type signatures.

type TaskBuilder() =
    // do!
    // Eventually<'a> * ('a -> Eventually<'b>) -> Eventually<'b>
    member x.Bind(e, f) = bind f e

    // return!
    // Eventually<'a> -> Eventually<'a>
    member x.ReturnFrom(r : Eventually<_>) = r

    // return
    // 'a -> Eventually<'a>
    member x.Return(r) = result r


let result r = Completed(r)

All functions in f# have to return something. So the following code

let rec wait() = task {
    input.Update()
    if not (input.IsStartPressed()) then
        do! sys.WaitNextFrame()
        do! wait()
}

is equivalent to

let rec wait() = task {
    input.Update()
    if not (input.IsStartPressed()) then
        do! sys.WaitNextFrame()
        do! wait()
        return ()
}

If we look at the definition of Return it calls result which in-turn returns a Completed(r).

I made two small test for task.

let test7() =
    let sch = new Scheduler()
    let sys = new Environment(sch)

    let rec hop i = task {
        printfn "%i: Hop!" i
        //do! sys.Wait(1.0f)
        if i > 0 then
            do! hop (i - 1)
            return ()
    }

    runAllFixed sch 0.1f [| hop 3 |]

let test8() =
    let sch = new Scheduler()
    let sys = new Environment(sch)

    let rec hop i = task {
        printfn "%i: Hop!" i
        //do! sys.Wait(1.0f)
        if i > 0 then
            return! hop (i - 1)
    }

    runAllFixed sch 0.1f [| hop 3 |]

test7()
printfn "\n" 
test8()

With some instrumentation it prints.

Delay 3: Hop!
Delay Bind Running 2: Hop!
Delay Bind Running Running 1: Hop!
Delay Bind Running Running Running 0: Hop!
Zero Completed Running Running Return Completed Running Return Completed Return


Delay 3: Hop!
Delay ReturnFrom 2: Hop!
Delay ReturnFrom 1: Hop!
Delay ReturnFrom 0: Hop!
Zero

MSDN doc on Computation Expression calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Both you and desco mention the result of do! being bound to Zero(), but as far as I have seen, this is not correct. Instead, it's bound to Return(). See cs.hubfs.net/forums/thread/18215.aspx . I don't know if that's a bug or a feature. –  Joh Feb 5 '11 at 6:43
    
Your right. The Zero is only executed at the end. I'll update my answer in a little while. –  gradbot Feb 5 '11 at 16:45
    
Nice edit! Really highlights the importance of return! –  Joh Feb 7 '11 at 11:42

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