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I'm trying create a function that returns a matrix containing a variable "l" which is an independent variable to be swept for a plot later on.

I would calculate "phi" based on user inputs which include "n" and "d", then I would use "n", "d", and "phi" to find "a", "b", "c", and "d" to create a matrix "m" with. This matrix "m" will be a function of "l".

phi = 2*pi*n*d/l;
a = cos(phi);
b = 1i*sin(phi)/n;
c = 1i*n*sin(phi);
d = cos(phi);
m = [a b;c d];

I'm really not enjoying MATLAB's coding style as compared to C++ and Python... How would you guys implement this functionality?

Summary: I want a function that returns a matrix which contains an independent variable to be swept for a plot later.

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2 Answers 2

You can two options.

1) Create a function which returns the matrix based on n,d,l

BuildM = @(n,d,l)[cos((2*pi*d*n)/l),(sin((2*pi*d*n)/l)*i)/n;n*sin((2*pi*d*n)/l)*i,cos((2*pi*d*n)/l)];

BuildM(4,2,100)  %ans=[0.8763,0.1204i;1.9270i,0.8763]

2) Use the symbolic toolbox (if possible)

syms n,d,l
phi = 2*pi*n*d/l;
a = cos(phi);
b = 1i*sin(phi)/n;
c = 1i*n*sin(phi);
d = cos(phi);
m = [a b;c d];

subs(m,{'n','d','l'},{4,2,100})  %ans=[0.8763,0.1204i;1.9270i,0.8763]
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Does the solution for 1) allow l to be a symbol? –  user603479 Feb 4 '11 at 17:58
    
I'm going to be multiplying a ton of those "m" matrices by eachother, each one will contain the variable "l". Then, later on, I'm going to plot the result and "l" is going to be varied. –  user603479 Feb 4 '11 at 18:03
    
yes, you can combine function handles (the @ syntax) with symbolic variables. –  ja72 Feb 4 '11 at 18:06
    
Okay, great. I'll test this out when I get home. I really appreciate your time. –  user603479 Feb 4 '11 at 19:32

Do you mean to use the symbolic toolbox?

If so, I guess you want:

phi = 2*pi*n*d/sym('l');
a = cos(phi);
b = 1i*sin(phi)/n;
c = 1i*n*sin(phi);
d = cos(phi);
m = [a b;c d];

And as a little aside, are you aware of your aliasing of d? Is that intentional?

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What do you mean by "aliasing of d"? –  user603479 Feb 4 '11 at 17:58
    
you use d in your definition of d, but reassign d for constructing your matrix m. It would be better to not use the same variable name for semantically different values within the same scope. –  wich Feb 4 '11 at 21:11
    
Gotcha. I didn't notice that. –  user603479 Feb 4 '11 at 21:31

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