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iPhone OpenGL ES 2.0..

  • First frame, render to my framebuffer then present it (as it works by default in the template OpenGL ES application).
  • On the next frame, I want to use that rendered framebuffer as an input in to my shaders, while rendering to another framebuffer and presenting that 2nd framebuffer.
  • The next frame, I want to use framebuffer2 as input in to my shaders, while rendering to the first framebuffer again.
  • Repeat

How do I do this?

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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You should be able to set up a renderbuffer that has a texture backing it using code like the following:

// Offscreen position framebuffer object
glGenFramebuffers(1, &positionFramebuffer);
glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, positionFramebuffer);

glGenRenderbuffers(1, &positionRenderbuffer);
glBindRenderbuffer(GL_RENDERBUFFER, positionRenderbuffer);

glRenderbufferStorage(GL_RENDERBUFFER, GL_RGBA8_OES, FBO_WIDTH, FBO_HEIGHT);
glFramebufferRenderbuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0, GL_RENDERBUFFER, positionRenderbuffer); 

// Offscreen position framebuffer texture target
glGenTextures(1, &positionRenderTexture);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, positionRenderTexture);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE);

glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL_RGBA, FBO_WIDTH, FBO_HEIGHT, 0, GL_RGBA, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, 0);

glFramebufferTexture2D(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, GL_COLOR_ATTACHMENT0, GL_TEXTURE_2D, positionRenderTexture, 0);

Switching buffers is as simple as using code like this:

glBindFramebuffer(GL_FRAMEBUFFER, positionFramebuffer);        
glViewport(0, 0, FBO_WIDTH, FBO_HEIGHT);

You can then render to that buffer and display the resulting texture by passing it into a simple shader that displays it within a rectangular piece of geometry. That texture can also be fed into a shader which renders into another similar renderbuffer that is backed by a texture, and so on.

If you need to do some CPU-based processing or readout, you can use glReadPixels() to pull in the pixels from this offscreen renderbuffer.

For examples of this, you can try out my sample applications here and here. The former does processing of video frames from a camera, with one of the settings allowing for a passthrough of the video while doing processing in an offscreen renderbuffer. The latter example renders into a cube map texture at one point, then uses that texture to do environment mapping on a teapot.

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That's a fantastic answer. Why do you call it "position" Framebuffer? –  Nektarios Feb 4 '11 at 19:47
    
@Nektarios - That was code lifted from the first example project I linked. For a color tracking algorithm, I replaced every pixel that's within a certain threshold with the relative X position in the red component and relative Y position within the green component (with the others being 1.0). Therefore, after a pass on the image, the average color of all pixels passing the test is the centroid of the object being tracked. See here for more: sunsetlakesoftware.com/2010/10/22/… –  Brad Larson Feb 4 '11 at 19:51
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