Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I was given this little bit of code by my teacher for this weeks lab to help out and sadly it helps a bit but just not enough. In the context im in "selectedType" i'm not sure about and that's not why i'm here. I'm here because I wanna know if someone can explain what "Airplane.Type.Fighter" could be. Airplane is a class connected to this one. But i'm not sure if Type is another class that should be inside of Airplane or not.

Thoughts?

switch (selectedType)
{
  case Airplane.Type.Fighter:
    newPlane = new FighterJet(name, position, cboPlaneType.SelectedItem);
    break;
  case Airplane.Type.Passenger:
    int numPassengers = Utilities.getIntegerInputValue(txtNumberPassengers);
    newPlane =
    new PassengerAirplane(name, position, txtType.Text, txtFlightNumber.Text, numPassengers);
    break;
  default:
    newPlane = new Airplane(name, position);
    break;
  }
share|improve this question
    
looks like enum to me or const –  Kris Ivanov Feb 4 '11 at 17:20
    
It's an inner Enum. See this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/980766/… –  Sean Feb 4 '11 at 17:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, we can only guess here. My guess is that Airplane is a property of the current class and that Airplane.Type is an enumeration with values such as FighterJet and Passenger.

As sean pointed out in the comments, it's a good chance that it's an inner enumeration.

share|improve this answer
1  
No, Airplane is not a property, it's clearly a class. But here we see the problems with letting the non-expert asking the question pick the "best" answer. –  Ben Voigt Feb 4 '11 at 17:37
    
It can very well be a property. The only thing indicating it's a class is the new Airplane part, but the property can very well be named Airplane. –  alexn Feb 4 '11 at 17:39
    
No, it cannot be a property. If it were, it wouldn't work in the case statement. –  Pedro Feb 4 '11 at 19:09
    
Yep, you're actually right. Missed that one. You shouldn't be on SO this late :) –  alexn Feb 4 '11 at 22:30
public class Airplane
{
    public enum Type
    {
        Fighter,
        Passenger
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It looks like it's probably an enum

share|improve this answer

You need to write the definitions of Airplane here, to get an answer. This information is insufficient for an answer.

share|improve this answer

It could be a Class.Enum.EnumType or it can be Class.Class.Const

share|improve this answer

It's easy to find out if you look at the definition of the Airplane class. Also, the type of selectedType should give you an indication. If you don't have the source code, Visual Studio can generate a class outline for you if you right click on Airplane.Type.Passenger (for example) and choose "Go To Definition". Also, you can use a tool like Reflector to look at the code.

But, it seems it's a nested enum (the most obvious choice):

class Airplane {
  public enum Type {
    Fighter,
    Passenger
  }
}

But it can also be a nested type with constants:

class Airplane {
  public static class Type {
    public const string Fighter = "Fighter";
    public const string Passenger = "Passenger";
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.