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If I expose an IEnumerable<T> as a property of a class, is there any possibility that it can be mutated by the users of a class, and if so what is the best way of protecting against mutation, while keeping the exposed property's type IEnumerable<T>?

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up vote 12 down vote accepted

It depends on what you're returning. If you return (say) a mutable List<string> then the client could indeed cast it back to List<string> and mutate it.

How you protect your data depends on what you've got to start with. ReadOnlyCollection<T> is a good wrapper class, assuming you've got an IList<T> to start with.

If your clients won't benefit from the return value implementing IList<T> or ICollection<T>, you could always do something like:

public IEnumerable<string> Names
{
    get { return names.Select(x => x); }
}

which effectively wraps the collection in an iterator. (There are various different ways of using LINQ to hide the source... although it's not documented which operators hide the source and which don't. For example calling Skip(0) does hide the source in the Microsoft implementation, but isn't documented to do so.)

Select definitely should hide the source though.

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1  
As usual, Jon Skeet provides a good answer. I just need to add that different data collection types aren't meant to be used for security in programs. If we run in full trust environment, one can always dig deep into our objects to find anything hidden inside. We need to use application security mechanisms if we really need to protect collections from changes. – Al Kepp Feb 4 '11 at 17:34

The user may be able to cast back to the collection class, so expose.

collection.Select(x => x)

and this will get a new IEnumerable created that can't be cast to the collection

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I like this. Understand that if the collection is a reference type, the elements' members will still be mutable, however changing cardinality and order of the enumerable by slurping it into a list or array will not affect the original collection. – KeithS Feb 4 '11 at 19:16

The collection can be cast back to the original type and if it is mutable then it can then be mutated.

One way to avoid the possibility of the original being mutated is returning a copy of the list.

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Making a clone is a possible way, right, but is that really "the best way"? Maybe sometimes it is, but sometimes not. – Al Kepp Feb 4 '11 at 17:29
    
Returning a copy is expensive for large collections. Unless I really need the semantics of a copy I prefer wrappers like JonSkeet suggested. – CodesInChaos Feb 4 '11 at 17:29
    
@Al, @CodeInChaos - Fair points... answer amended. – Oded Feb 4 '11 at 17:30

I would not suggest wrapping an IEnumerable in an iterator to prevent recipients from monkeying with the underlying connection. My inclination would be to use a wrapper something like:

public struct WrappedEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> _dataSource;
    public WrappedEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> dataSource)
    {
        _dataSource = dataSource;
    }
    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _dataSource.GetEnumerator();
    }
    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ((System.Collections.IEnumerable)_dataSource).GetEnumerator();
    }
}

If the return type of the properties is IEnumerable<T>, the type coercion from WrappedEnumerable<T> to IEnumerable<T> would box the structure and make the behavior and performance match those of a class. If, however, the properties, were defined as returning type WrappedEnumerable<T>, then it would be possible to save a boxing step in cases where the calling code either assigns the return to a property of type WrappedEnumerable<T> (most likely as a result of something like var myKeys = myCollection.Keys;) or simply uses the property directly in a "foreach" loop. Note that if the enumerator returned by GetEnumerator() would be a struct, that will still have to be boxed in any case.

The performance advantage of using a struct rather than a class would generally be fairly slight; conceptually, however, using a struct would fit with the general recommendation that properties not create new heap object instances. Constructing a new struct instance which contains nothing but a reference to an existing heap object is very cheap. The biggest disadvantage to using a struct as defined here would be that it would lock in the behavior of the thing returned to the calling code, whereas simply returning IEnumerable<T> would allow other approaches.

Note also that it may in some cases be possible to eliminate the requirement for any boxing and exploit the duck-typing optimizations in C# and vb.net foreach loop if one used a type like:

public struct FancyWrappedEnumerable<TItems,TEnumerator,TDataSource> : IEnumerable<TItems> where TEnumerator : IEnumerator<TItems>
{
    TDataSource _dataSource;
    Func<TDataSource,TEnumerator> _convertor;
    public FancyWrappedEnumerable(TDataSource dataSource, Func<TDataSource, TEnumerator> convertor)
    {
        _dataSource = dataSource;
        _convertor = convertor;
    }
    public TEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _convertor(_dataSource);
    }
    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _convertor(_dataSource);
    }
}

The convertor delegate could be a static delegate, and thus not require any heap-object creation at run-time (outside class initialization). Using this approach, if one wanted to return an enumerator from a List<int>, the property return type would be FancyWrappedEnumerable<int, List<int>.Enumerator, List>. Perhaps reasonable if the caller just used the property directly in a foreach loop, or in a var declaration, but rather icky if the caller wanted to declare a storage location of the type in a way that couldn't use var.

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