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I'd like to do something like this:

class Basehandler(webapp.RequestHandler):

  def __init__(self):
    if checkforspecialcase: #check something that always needs to be handled
      return SpecialCaseHandler.get()

class NormalHandler(Basehandler):

  def get(self):
    print 'hello world'
    return

class SpecialCaseHandler(Basehandler):

  def get(self):
    print 'hello special world'
    return

The idea is that no matter what handler is initially called, if a certain case is met, we basically switch to another handler.

I'm pretty new to python, so I'm not sure whether what I'm trying to do is possible. Or whether this is the best approach. What I'm really trying to do is make sure to show someone the complete-your-profile page if they've started the registration process but haven't completed it... no matter what request they're making. So the "checkforspecialcase" looks at their sessions and checks for incomplete info.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

To keep things DRY, use the Template Method pattern

class BaseHandler(webapp.RequestHandler):
    def DoGet(self, *args):
        ''' defined in derived classes, actual per-handler get() logic'''
        pass

    def get(self, *args):
        # don't get caught in endless redirects!
        if specialCase and not self.request.path.startswith('/special'):
            self.redirect('/special')
        else:
            self.DoGet(*args)

class NormalHandler(BaseHandler):
    def DoGet(self, *args):
        # normal stuff

class SpecialHandler(BaseHandler):
    def DoGet(self, *args):
        # SPECIAL stuff
share|improve this answer

WSGIApplication routes incoming requests based on the URL. For example,

application = webapp.WSGIApplication(
              [('/special-case', SpecialCaseHandler)])

When checkforspecialcase passes, you can use self.redirect('/special-case').

share|improve this answer
    
That was the first thing I tried, but no go. If you put self.redirect('/special-case') after the conditional above, you would get the following error: "AttributeError: 'NormalHandler' object has no attribute 'request'" Redirect only seems to work if you call it from within a get() or post() method, but not from an initialization method. – Bob Ralian Feb 5 '11 at 6:21
    
Yes, that's right. Why don't you just use that conditional in a get method? Why do we need an __init__? – dheerosaur Feb 5 '11 at 6:39
    
Because I want this conditional to be applied on all pages, so it makes sense to go once in the basehandler class. And I believe get/post methods in classes that extend basehandler overwrite get/post methods in basehandler. So to put this in get/post methods, I'd need to put it in every get/post method. Just trying to be DRY. – Bob Ralian Feb 5 '11 at 17:47

Your Basehandler could just implement a get() that checks for the special case and either redirects or calls self.view(), and each handler could implement view() (or whatever you'd like to call it) rather than get().

I'm not really into writing a class for each of my handlers, or using inheritance so conspicuously, so I'd recommend rolling decorators like these:

routes = []

def get (route):
    def makeHandler (handle, *args, **kwargs):
        class Handler (webapp.RequestHandler):
            def get (self, *args, **kwargs):
                shouldRedirectToCompleteProfile = # do your test
                if shouldRedirectToCompleteProfile:
                    self.redirect('/special-case')
                else:
                    handle(self, *args, **kwargs)
        routes.append((route, Handler))
        return Handler
    return makeHandler

def post (route):
    def makeHandler (handle, *args, **kwargs):
        class Handler (webapp.RequestHandler):
            def post (self, *args, **kwargs):
                handle(self, *args, **kwargs)
        routes.append((route, Handler))
        return Handler
    return makeHandler

@get('/')
def home (ctx):
    # <...>

@get('/whatever/(.*)/(.*)')
def whatever (ctx, whatever0, whatever1):
    # <...>

@post('/submit')
def submit (ctx):
    # <...>

application = webapp.WSGIApplication(routes)
share|improve this answer
    
The only issue with the way @bgporter does it is that if, when you're coding your 100th handler, you accidentally implement get() rather than DoGet(), you'll have an annoying bug. You could set yourself at ease by writing one hundred functional tests that check for the redirect or writing a static-analysis unit test that looks for get() overrides. Or, if you use decorators like I'm suggesting, you don't need any tests, because it's impossible to introduce that kind of bug. – dfichter Feb 6 '11 at 16:40

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