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I have the following code:

class MyClass:
    def __private(self):
        print "Hey man! This is private!"

    def public(self):
        __private()
        print "I don't care if you see this!"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = MyClass()
    x.public()

However it gives me the following error:

NameError: global name '_MyClass__private' is not defined

What am I doing wrong?

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3  
Also, if you haven't already, read this section of the documentation: docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html#private-variables Single underscores are the typical convention for "private" variables. You typically only use double underscores when you want to avoid name clashes in classes that inherit from your MyClass. Double underscores will invoke name mangling, which may be what you wanted here, but I wanted to make sure you're aware of it... –  Joe Kington Feb 4 '11 at 17:57
1  
Please do not use __. It's reserved for "name mangling", a thing Python does internally to make sure the internal names never collide. –  S.Lott Feb 4 '11 at 18:11
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2 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You need self:

self.__private()

Classes in python take getting used to if you're coming from C#/C++/Java, like it looks like you are. This is probably butchering the "pythonic" way of wording things, but you can think about it like this (it helped me out):

Each class defines a namespace defined from within itself as self and from without by the name of an instance of that class. "Private" things with two underscores get mangled so that from without you have to call it by a special name, but from within you can simply use self.__private().

As Joe mentioned in his comment normal private variables are typically just named with a single underscore, the double underscore mangles it so inheritance can work without name clashes in sub-classes. There's no enforcement of privacy in python, it's purely convention that says you can't use a private variable from outside the class.

As Thomas mentioned, self is also a convention. For any method (a function declared as part of a class) the instance that the method is being called on is the first parameter passed in. You could just as easily do this:

def __private(randomText):
    print "Hey man! This is private!"

def public(otherRandomText):
    otherRandomText.__private()
    print "I don't care if you see this!"

However, if you do that the spirits of logic and good programming style will haunt you and your descendants for all eternity. (self is much preferable).

Any pythonistas wish to correct/further-explain?

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And now I feel like a total idiot. Thanks! –  Bob Dylan Feb 4 '11 at 17:52
2  
Don't worry about it man! I can't tell you how many times I've done that. It'll probably keep happening whenever you switch between languages. –  Christopher Pfohl Feb 4 '11 at 17:56
2  
@Bob @Cpfohl Yup, catches me out every time in PHP, too, just because I spent so many years doing C++... –  Matt Gibson Feb 4 '11 at 18:19
    
Wonderful explanation. You were right in assuming that I was coming from a C-Style language (C#). –  Bob Dylan Feb 4 '11 at 18:20
3  
Strictly speaking, the name self is a convention, not hardcoded. Any methods of a class get the instance automatically passed as the first variable, and we use self to refer to that. This is academic, though: I've never seen a reason to call it anything other than self. –  Thomas K Feb 4 '11 at 18:43
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Your code as is is trying to call a static function MyCalls.__private, you want to do this:

class MyClass:
    def __private(self):
        print "Hey man! This is private!"

    def public(self):
        self.__private()
        print "I don't care if you see this!"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    x = MyClass()
    x.public()
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