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Is there a standard method for calculating fixed width values for tables in HTML? Right now, I'm working on formatting tables on a web page to be a fixed width, I have a table that's within another table, when testing the page in IE I notice that the alignment of the colon is off as the second picture below illustrates. My intention is to make sure the colons are properly aligned as they are in Firefox and was just curious if the misalignment was due to the settings in the HTML or if it has more to do with how the browser renders the page.

Firefox: enter image description here

Internet Explorer:

enter image description here

UPDATE:

Sorry for not providing any reference code, here's a snippet of the particular section I'm working with.

<div style="width: 1600px; text-align: center; position: absolute; top: 10%; left: 0%;">
    <span id="labelInstructions" style="font-size: xx-large;">PAGE TITLE <br><br></span>
    <table style="width: 1000px;" align="Center" border="0">
        <tbody>
            <tr>
                <td style="width: 1000px;"><label for="FileUpload1" style="font-size: x-large;">ENTER: </label><input name="FileUpload1" id="FileUpload1" size="70%" type="file"></td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td style="width: 1000px;"><span id="fileUploadError" style="color: Red; font-size: medium;"><br><br></span></td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td style="width: 1000px;">
                <table style="width: 1260px;" border="0">
                    <tbody>
                        <tr>
                            <td style="font-size: x-large; width: 800px;" align="right" valign="top">FILE INSTRUCTIONS:</td>
                            <td style="font-size: x-large; width: 1800px;" align="left" valign="top">INSTRUCTION 1<br>INSTRUCTION 2<br></td>
                        </tr>
                        <tr>
                            <td></td>
                        </tr>
                        <tr>
                            <td style="font-size: x-large; width: 800px;" align="right" valign="top">FILE EXAMPLE:</td>
                            <td style="font-size: x-large; width: 1800px;" align="left" valign="top">EXAMPLE 1<br>EXAMPLE 2<br><br></td>
                        </tr>
                    </tbody>
                </table>
                </td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>
</div>

I know it's ugly, just a note, this is an ASP.Net generated webpage and I'm setting the attributes of the HTML elements pro-grammatically from the code behind. I sorta inherited this and my employer wants to keep major changes to a minimum.

UPDATE 2:

When I adjust the inner table width I can get it to align in IE when set to 1377px. For Firefox, the sweet spot for alignment is 1260px.

share|improve this question
    
I would only do this with nested tables as a last resort. Anyway, some html and/or css would be helpful, or at least some borders to be able to see the layout properly. My guess would be that you need to make the TDs of fixed width and allow wrapping, but perhaps you already have it that way? –  AJJ Feb 4 '11 at 21:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

All you have to do is make the table columns the same width as each other.

Example of style:

table tr td:first-child { background-color:yellow; width:200px; }

HTML:

<table>
  <tr><td>Row 1 Cell 1</td><td>Row 1 Cell 2</td></tr>
  <tr><td>Row 2 Cell 1</td><td>Row 2 Cell 2</td></tr>
  <tr><td>Row 3 Cell 1</td><td>Row 3 Cell 2</td></tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer

Sorry for not directly answering to your question, but...

Stoneage is over! You really shouldn't use Tables for layouting-purposes, as they are hardly-accessible for disabled people and make your HTML-File way too big (in relation to the content).

Seperate Content and Layout, use CSS.

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2  
This is an ideological question, and it does not help him to say, "think over all you have done so far". –  aorcsik Feb 4 '11 at 21:06
    
Yeah, I'm really sorry for not directly answering to his question, but I just can't stand table layouts. Sorry, mate. :) –  anroesti Feb 4 '11 at 21:07
    
First, this is better suited as a comment, not an answer to a question. Second, while you are correct that using table-based layouts is "outdated", you cannot just assume he has the power to choose... maybe he is maintaining a clients website and they don't want to pay for a redesign? Maybe he is using this code to create a layout for tabular data (a scenario where using tables is more compliant than using divs). You get the idea... –  Moses Feb 4 '11 at 21:10
    
Don't want to start an argument, just think that we still use the wheel, which was invented in stoneage. :) Peace –  aorcsik Feb 4 '11 at 21:11
1  
@ andre_roesti - I understand your point andre I wouldn't have designed it this wway either. As I state in my UPDATE, this is something I inherited and yes as Moses suggests, the system is much more intricate. My employer has particular requirements I must take into account, so I have to work with what I've got. –  kingrichard2005 Feb 4 '11 at 22:03

Make sure to place the the parts that you want to align together in one table.

<table id="layout">
    <tr><td>HEADER</td>
    <tr><td>
        <table id="form">
            <tr><td>LABEL</td><td>INPUT FIELD</td></tr>
            <tr><td>LABEL</td><td>INPUT FIELD</td></tr>
            <tr><td>LABEL</td><td>INPUT FIELD</td></tr>
        </table>
    </tr>
    <tr><td>FOOTER</td>
</table>
share|improve this answer

i would create two classes, left and right and apply the left class to the <td> on the left and the right class to the <td> on the right. the left class would be something like

.left{width:100px; text-align:right;}

heres an example

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