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I have made what is essentially a lightbox whereby if a change requires the user to confirm their password, this lightbox pops up and the user enters there password etc.

I am triggering the function like this:

if(verifyPassword())
{
    //apply change
}

The verify function is:

function verifyPassword() {
$('#confirmpasswordoverlay').fadeIn(300);

$('#submit').click(function() {
    $.post('', { password: $('input[name=password]').val() }, 
            function(check) {
                if(check.error)
                {
                    if(check.password)
                    {
                        //show password error
                        return false;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        //show error
                        return false;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    return true;
                }
            }, 'json');
});

}

Basically I am needing the function to wait until #submit is clicked to return either true or false.

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since jQuery 1.5.0, you can do apply some magic with Deferred objects:

$.when( verifyPassword() ).done(function() {
    // do something
});

You would need to re-write verifyPassword() a little:

function verifyPassword() {
    var Notify = $.Deferred();
    $('#confirmpasswordoverlay').fadeIn(300);

    $('#submit').click(function() {
        $.post('', { password: $('input[name=password]').val() }, 
                function(check) {
                    if(check.error) {
                        if(check.password) {
                            //show password error
                            Notify.resolve();
                        }
                        else {
                            //show error
                            Notify.reject();
                        }
                    }
                    else {
                        return true;
                    }
                }, 'json');
        });

    return Notify.promise();
}

This might not be the most elegant way of achieving your goal here, I'm just saying you could do it in a way like this :-)

share|improve this answer
    
I got to test this when get home, never knew about this technique. Looks interesting. – Pablo Feb 4 '11 at 21:54
1  
+1 didn't know about Deferred. – sissonb Feb 4 '11 at 21:55
    
Thanks thats exactly what I was looking for! One thing though, if the user gets the password wrong and clicks again it will not run the original function: $.when( verifyPassword() ).done(function() { ... – Jamie Feb 4 '11 at 22:19
    
Nevermind, I figured it out... Simply don't put Notify.reject() where an incorrect password error has occured. Thanks again, i wasn't even aware v1.5 was released! – Jamie Feb 4 '11 at 23:06
    
@jAndy rather then having your own $.Deferred object you can return the deferred object from $.post – Raynos Feb 6 '11 at 16:05

Don't stall, instead provide a callback:

function verifyPassword(f) {
    /**
    * Do all your logic here, then callback to the passed function
    */
    f(result);
}
verifyPassword(function (correct) {
    if (correct) {
        /* Continue */
    }
    else { /* Other */ }
});
share|improve this answer
    
It wont work, as $.post wont return anything to parent function. He does needs a new function that he can call from within $.post callback function – Pablo Feb 4 '11 at 21:49
    
@Pablo: I'm omitting the $.post code, f(result) would go in the callback from that. – Josh K Feb 4 '11 at 21:56

I think you want to convert your $.post() call into the more generic $.ajax() jQuery call, and pass in async: false. Something like:

$.ajax('', { async:false, data: {password:...}, success: function() {
    // ... success callback ...
}});
share|improve this answer
    
Never use async=false It locks the UI. There are very view cases for it use. and this is not one of them – Raynos Feb 6 '11 at 16:07

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