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I am using Apache commons cli (1.2) for command line parsing.

I have the following in my code:

import org.apache.commons.cli.OptionBuilder
OptionBuilder.withLongOpt("db-host").hasArg.
withDescription("Name of the database host").create('h')

I get the error hasArg is not a member of org.apache.commons.cli.OptionBuilder. It makes no difference if I change .hasArg to .hasArg().

Why?

BTW, Java parses this fine.

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(Reminder: Turn on warnings in javac/Eclipse/wherever.) –  user166390 Feb 4 '11 at 22:21
    
@pst: I have them on. I am working in Netbeans (best Scala support, IMHO) and it underlined the hasArg method. I would prefer to work in IntelliJ, but the Scala plugin has some serious bugs with reformatting code. I have submitted bug reports, but so far, no fixes have been posted. –  Ralph Feb 5 '11 at 13:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted
import org.apache.commons.cli.OptionBuilder
OptionBuilder.withLongOpt("db-host").hasArg.
withDescription("Name of the database host").create('h')

I get the error hasArg is not a member of org.apache.commons.cli.OptionBuilder. It makes no difference if I change .hasArg to .hasArg().

Why?

Because there is no instance method hasArg in OptionBuilder, only a static method. Since hasArg is a static method, you obviously need to call it on the class, not on an instance of the class.

BTW, Java parses this fine.

I don't understand what this has to do with parsing. Scala parses this just fine, too. Plus, what some completely different programming does or doesn't do with this code is utterly irrelevant, since this is Scala code, not some other language.

You need to do something like this:

import org.apache.commons.cli.OptionBuilder

OptionBuilder.withLongOpt("db-host")
OptionBuilder.hasArg
OptionBuilder.withDescription("Name of the database host")

val optionParser = OptionBuilder.create('h')
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5  
Ergh, this OptionBuilder has a horrible interface! –  pedrofurla Feb 4 '11 at 22:13
3  
@pedrofurla: It accidentally works in Java, because in Java, static methods can be called on an instance, and if there is no corresponding instance method, instead of throwing an error, the system will silently convert it into a static method call for you. Therefore, in Java, it looks like a Fluent Interface using Method Chaining, when in fact, it is not. The proper way to do this, would probably be to use an intermediate state object to capture the method calls, maybe even some kind of a Type State Machine. –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 4 '11 at 22:16
1  
The important word in my comment above is of course "accidentally". As @pst hinted above, this will generate a stern warning in pretty much any Java IDE and/or editor, and most style checkers (CheckStyle, PMD, ...) will reject it. –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 4 '11 at 22:25
    
Of course! I did not think of that (Java will call a static method on an instance of a class). Other than your suggestion of breaking out the individual lines, is there any way to accomplish the same thing in Scala? BTW, I agree that OptionBuilder has a horrible interface. –  Ralph Feb 5 '11 at 13:50
    
Someone just asked and deleted a duplicate question, to which I was about to reply that this class is deprecated in trunk, FWIW. But it's great that Scala refuses to interoperate with it. –  som-snytt May 1 '14 at 17:25

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