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Why does the following code leak?

for (var i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    var item = {};
    item.elem = document.createElement('div');
    document.body.appendChild(item.elem);
    item.addEvent = function(name,listener) {
        var self = this;
        var wrappedListener = function() {
            return listener.apply(self,arguments);
        }
        //Uh-oh creating a circular reference here!
        //The wrappedListener has a closure on self and therefore on item.elem.
        addEvent(this.elem,name,wrappedListener);
        return wrappedListener;
    }
    var wrap = item.addEvent('eventName',listen);

    //Now remove the eventHandler - this should free up the circular reference.
    removeEvent(item.elem, 'eventName', wrap);
    if (item.elem.parentNode) {
        item.elem.parentNode.removeChild(item.elem);
    }
    //item.elem = null; //With this also un-commented, the leak disappears.
    //The fact that I have to null item.elem tells me that something is holding
    //a reference to item, and therefore elem. Setting elem to null fixes the
    //problem, but since I am removing the event handler, I don't think this
    //should be required.
}

Note: addEvent and removeEvent are just to abstract attachEvent/addEventListener differences between Internet Explorer and other browsers.

I created a jsFiddle project which demonstrates the problem. Just fire up Internet Explorer 8 and watch it go in Task Manager or Process Explorer. Also, you will see the definition of addEvent and removeEvent there.

http://jsfiddle.net/rJ8x5/34/

EDIT: Well, I came up with the following solution. It is not pretty, but it works! http://jsfiddle.net/rJ8x5/43/

var item = {};
item.elem = document.createElement('div');
document.body.appendChild(item.elem);
item.addEvent = function(name,listener) {
    var wrappedListener = function() {
        //Access the scope through the callee properties.
        return listener.apply( arguments.callee.scope, arguments);
    }
    addEvent(this.elem,name,wrappedListener);
    //Save the scope not as a closure, but as a property on the handler.
    wrappedListener.scope = this
    return wrappedListener;
}
var wrap = item.addEvent('eventName',listen);
removeEvent(item.elem, 'eventName', wrap);
//Force the circular reference to GO AWAY.
wrap.scope = null
if (item.elem.parentNode) {
    item.elem.parentNode.removeChild(item.elem);
}
//item.elem = null; //No longer needed.
share|improve this question
    
I know that IE used to have a bug where it would use separate garbage collection for native objects and javascript objects, so any time you form a cycle between javascript objects and native objects, neither garbage collector could clean it up. Could that be it? I'm thinking that item points to item.elem which is a div that has handlers that refer back to item. –  btilly Feb 4 '11 at 22:13
    
— Not really pertinent to your question, but you can eliminate the self variable by using listener.apply(item, arguments) instead. :-) –  Ben Blank Feb 4 '11 at 22:15
    
Totally! But this is actaully a much simplified version of a class that I wrote where the addEvent method does not have access to the instance so conveniently - hence var self = this –  jordancpaul Feb 4 '11 at 23:00
    
Opening post has been updated with a solution to the problem –  jordancpaul Mar 2 '11 at 22:38
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is the events (as almost always in Internet Explorer, BTW).

Look at http://jsfiddle.net/rJ8x5/39/ and notice how it garbage collects fine.

You are creating circular references when you attach the events. Read more about it in Circular references to DOM objects on an HTML page cause a memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! Yes, because the function traps a reference to the DOM element in the closure, and so when it's garbage collected by JScript the DOM element leaks. Is that right? –  Pointy Feb 4 '11 at 22:57
    
@Pointy: Yes, it's all about scoping of the event handler, or rather about the DOM references trapped in that scope :) –  Martin Jespersen Feb 4 '11 at 23:00
    
I am aware of IE's circular reference related memory leaks. The point here, however, is the I am specifically removing the event handler. Should this not break the circular reference? –  jordancpaul Feb 4 '11 at 23:03
    
@jordancpaul: For some reason ie doesn't understand that it is ok to garbage collect the handler, or more specifically it's scope when you have removed it. This has been the way in ie for a long time... read this for kicks: javascript.crockford.com/memory/leak.html –  Martin Jespersen Feb 4 '11 at 23:08
    
I have updated my original post with additional comments that better illustrate why I am confused. –  jordancpaul Feb 4 '11 at 23:09
show 6 more comments

The code leaks because you are calling attachEvent improperly - Microsoft's documentation insists that the event name be a standard DHTML event.

If you change 'eventName' to 'click', it does not leak.

A more robust solution would be to change your event attaching code to check 'on'+eventname in domElement and refuse to attach the event if this is false.

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