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def class A
  def a
    raise "hi" #can't be reached
  end

  class B
    def b
      a() #doesn't find method a.
    end
  end
end

I want to invoke a from b and raise the exception. How can I?

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Make B inherit A ? –  adamax Feb 4 '11 at 22:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Ruby doesn't have nested classes.

The only way to inherit behavior is, well, via inheritance.

If you want your code to work, you need to use a language which supports nested classes. While this is an incredibly neat and powerful feature, I unfortunately know of only two languages that have nested classes:

  • BETA, the language which introduced nested classes (and its successor gbeta)
  • Newspeak

I don't know of any other.

Java has a construct called nested classes, but they have some unfortunate design limitations.

In your example above, it's not the class B that is nested inside A, it is the constant B that is nested inside A. Think about this:

C = A::B

Now, the class is available under two names: A::B and C. It should be immediately obvious that C is global and not nested inside A. (Well, actually, C is nested inside Object, because there aren't really global constants either, but that's beside the point.) But since C and A::B are the same class, it obviously cannot be both nested and not nested. The only logical conclusion is that the class itself isn't nested.

The defining feature of nested classes is that method lookup goes along two dimensions: up the inheritance chain, and outwards through the nesting. Ruby, like 99.9% of all OO languages, only supports the former. (In some sense, nested classes inherit not only the features of their superclass, but also the features of their surrounding class.)

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3  
"Nested class and module definitions will be stored in constants within the class, not as global constants. These nested classes and modules can be accessed from outside the defining class using “::” to qualify their names." - From the Pickaxe. –  Michael Kohl Feb 4 '11 at 22:44
    
Thanks for adding the clarifying comment, +1 from me. –  Michael Kohl Feb 4 '11 at 22:50
1  
@Michael Kohl: Those aren't nested classes, those are namespaced constants. The first sentence gets it right. What I suppose has happened is that the second sentence originally read something like "nested constants referring to classes", and they thought it sounded a little forced, so they shortened it to "nested classes" without realizing their mistake. Kind of like everybody knows that Ruby doesn't have class methods, but we still call them "class methods", because the correct formulation "instance methods of the class object's singleton class" is so damn inconvenient. Unfortunately, this –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 4 '11 at 22:54
    
... kind of shortcut jargon can lead to significant confusion for outsiders and newbies. Just have a look at all the questions here on StackOverflow that ask "I know how to do X (mocking, overriding, overwriting, aliasing, wrapping, stubbing) with normal methods, but how do I do it with class methods?" Because of the shortcut jargon we use, they don't realize that they actually already know the answer to their own question, because there is no such thing as a class method. –  Jörg W Mittag Feb 4 '11 at 22:57
    
@Jörg: Yes, for this reason I though the OP was actually asking about "nested constants referring to classes", which led to my answer below. –  Michael Kohl Feb 4 '11 at 23:09

This is just for the lulz:

class A
  def a
    puts "hello from a"
  end

  class B
    def b
      Module.nesting[1].new.a()
    end
  end
end
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I typically do something like this:

class A
  def a
    puts "hi"
  end

  def createB
    B.new self
  end

  class B
    def initialize(parent)
      @parent=parent
    end

    def b
      @parent.a
    end
  end
end

A.new.createB.b
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If you want then nested class to extend the outer class, then do so:

class Outer

  class Inner < Outer
    def use_outer_method
      outer_method("hi mom!")
    end
  end

  def outer_method(foo)
    puts foo
  end

end

foo = Outer::Inner.new
foo.use_outer_method        #<= "hi mom"
foo.outer_method("hi dad!") #<= "hi dad"
share|improve this answer

Was a supposed to be a class method for class A?

class A
  def self.a
    raise "hi"
  end
  class B
    def b
      A::a 
    end
  end
end

A::B.new.b

If you want to keep it as an instance method, you'll obviously have call to it on an instance, like for example A.new.a.

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No, I really meant inner classes, Newspeak style. –  nes1983 Feb 4 '11 at 22:45

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