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I am implementing a column-major transformation matrix that looks something like this:

|----------|        |------------|      |------------|
| 0 3 6 9  |        | RS R  R  X |      | RS R  R  X |
| 1 4 7 10 |        | R  RS R  Y |      | R  RS R  Y |
| 2 5 8 11 |        | R  R  RS Z |      | R  R  RS Z |
|----------|        |------------|      | 0  0  0  1 |
                                       |------------|

I understand that scaling is supposed to be applied to positions 0, 4, and 8, but it doesn't seem to work. I set the orientation from a quaternion, set the position as appropriate, and then attempt to multiply in my scaling to positions 0, 4, and 8. When this transform is fed into OpenGL, my shapes stretch and squash and do not scale appropriately. Am I missing something here, I thought scaling was a simple multiplication along the diagonals? My orientation application is relatively straightforward, but adding the scaling operation to it results in strange sheering and squashing effects. What am I doing wrong?

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Is there a reason you are working with a 4x3 matrix instead of a 4x4 matrix? –  TheBuzzSaw Feb 4 '11 at 23:23
    
Yes, reduces the needed storage since the bottom row is automatically assumed to be 0, 0, 0, 1 because of homogenous coordinates. The bottom row is implied in calculations. –  Grimless Feb 4 '11 at 23:35
    
I guess my next question would then be: how exactly are you feeding your matrices into OpenGL? Are you using shaders? –  TheBuzzSaw Feb 4 '11 at 23:49
    
Not at this time. I am using glMultMatrixf(float[16]) while in GL_MODELVIEW. –  Grimless Feb 4 '11 at 23:57
    
Paste your code. Also, see this regarding OpenGL matrix order: j3d.org/matrix_faq/matrfaq_latest.html#I1 –  Vaayu Feb 5 '11 at 5:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The scaling matrix you have in mind is only useful for either only scaling, or multiplying it to an already existing transformation. As soon as the base transformation is not identity the sale factors apply on the whole upper left 3x3. Just evaluate the multiplication

/ Rxx Rxy Rxz \   / Sx  0  0  \
| Ryx Ryy Ryz | * |  0 Sy  0  |
\ Rzy Rzy Rzz /   \  0  0  Sz /

=

/ Rxx·Sx Rxy·Sy Rxz·Sz \
| Ryx·Sx Ryy·Sy Ryz·Sz |
\ Rzx·Sx Rzy·Sy Rzz·Sz /
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Well, poo. I was pretty sure I tried that already, but hey, I've been wrong before. Thank you very much! –  Grimless Feb 9 '11 at 1:06

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