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In Java you can build up an ArrayList with items and then call:

Collections.sort(list, comparator);

Is there anyway to pass in the Comparator at the time of List creation like you can do with TreeMap? The goal is to be able add an element to the list and instead of having it automatically appended to the end of the list, the list would keep itself sorted based on the Comparator and insert the new element at the index determined by the Comparator. So basically the list might have to re-sort upon every new element added.

Is there anyway to achieve this in this way with the Comparator or by some other similar means?

Thanks.

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3  
@To everyone offering PriorityQueue, it's implemented via Heap [backed by an array], thus it's not Iterable in its natural order but the heap 'building' order. Each operation to the heap needs sift-up/down. –  bestsss Feb 4 '11 at 22:56
4  
Use a TreeSet if you don't need any of the List features. –  Steve Kuo Feb 4 '11 at 23:13
5  
Such a thing would break the contract of List because List operations specify where they add the element... add(E) adds to the end, add(int, e) adds at the specified index, etc. set(int, E) would be even weirder. –  ColinD Feb 4 '11 at 23:28
3  
@Eric: It's a big deal if this List might be used by any code that expects a List that doesn't break its contract. –  ColinD Feb 4 '11 at 23:47
1  
@Eric: I'd say if all you want is to hold things, a Set or Multiset is more appropriate depending on whether you need to allow duplicate elements or not. Both of these also happen to have implementations that allow Comparator based ordering. Explicit, user-defined order (by insertion order and indexed insertion) is a core property of a List. –  ColinD Feb 5 '11 at 15:10

13 Answers 13

You can change the behaviour of ArrayList

List<MyType> list = new ArrayList<MyType>() {
    public boolean add(MyType mt) {
         super.add(mt);
         Collections.sort(list, comparator);
         return true;
    }
}; 

Note: a PriorityQueue is NOT a List, if you didn't care what type of collection it was, the simplest would be to use a TreeSet, which is just like a TreeMap but is a collection. The only advantage PriorityQueue has is to allow duplicates.

Note: resorting is not very efficient for large collections, Using a binary search and inserting an entry would be faster. (but more complicated)

EDIT: A lot depends on what you need the "list" to do. I suggest you write a List wrapper for a ArrayList, LinkedList, PriorityQueue, TreeSet or one of the other sorted collections and implement the methods which will actually be used. That way you have a good understanding of the requirements for the collection and you can make sure it works correctly for you.

EDIT(2): Since there was so much interest in using binarySearch instead. ;)

List<MyType> list = new ArrayList<MyType>() {
    public boolean add(MyType mt) {
        int index = Collections.binarySearch(this, mt);
        if (index < 0) index = ~index;
        super.add(index, mt);
        return true;
    }
};
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1  
+1, for a simple and effective solution. just, it might be better to return the result of super.add(..) rather than always true. Although in this case it doesn't matter, since ArrayList has hardcoded return true as well. –  Bozho Feb 4 '11 at 22:47
1  
PriorityQueue has more advantages: It's surely much more efficient both in terms of size and speed. –  maaartinus Feb 4 '11 at 22:57
    
@Bozho, If we where using a Set, the answer would be very different. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 4 '11 at 22:59
1  
sorting via Collections.sorts like that is quite inefficient, call toArray, clones the array and then uses sets via ListIterator. In that regard using LinkedList and inserting at the right position is a lot better option. –  bestsss Feb 4 '11 at 23:05
1  
@PeterLawrey as always, your solutions are excellent! you should be working on the framework at Google or Oracle (if you are not already). –  likejiujitsu May 14 at 15:45

Everyone is suggesting PriorityQueue. However, it is important to realize that if you iterate over the contents of a PriorityQueue, the elements will not be in sorted order. You are only guaranteed to get the "minimum" element from the methods peek(), poll(), etc.

A TreeSet seems to be a better fit. The caveats would be that, as a Set, it can't contain duplicate elements, and it doesn't support random access with an index.

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1  
You could simulate the random access using an iterator. It wouldn't be worse then for LinkedList. With a proprietary implementation it can be done in O(log(size)), see my answer. –  maaartinus Feb 4 '11 at 23:14

Something like TreeSet (or TreeMultiset in case you need duplicates) with more efficient random access is possible, but I doubt it was implemented in Java. Making each node of the tree remembers the size of its left subtree allows accessing an element by index in time O(log(size)) which is not bad.

In order to implement it, you'd need to rewrite a good portion of the underlying TreeMap.

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Yes, tree alike structure can have O(log2n) random access by index same for insert/remove/indexOf, etc. –  bestsss Feb 4 '11 at 23:12

I would use a Guava TreeMultiset assuming you want a List because you may have duplicate elements. It'll do everything you want. The one thing it won't have is index-based access, which doesn't make much sense given that you aren't putting elements at indices of your choosing anyway. The other thing to be aware of is that it won't actually store duplicates of equal objects... just a count of the total number of them.

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commons-collections have TreeBag

Initially I suggested PriorityQueue, but its iteration order is undefined, so it's no use, unless you iterate it by getting the head of a clone of the queue until it gets empty.

Since you are most likely concerned with the iteration order, I believe you can override the iterator() method:

public class OrderedIterationList<E> extends ArrayList<E> {
    @Override
    public Iterator<E> iterator() {
        Object[] array = this.toArray(); // O(1)
        Arrays.sort(array);
        return Arrays.asList(array).iterator(); // asList - O(1)
    }
}

You can improve this by storing a snapshot of the sorted collection, and use modCount to verify whether the collection is not changed.

Depending on the use-cases, this may be less or more efficient than Peter's suggestion. For example if you add multiple items, and iterate. (without adding items between iterations), then this might be more efficient.

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1  
iteration of a PriorityQueue does NOT perserve order, and the most common reason to sort a List is to iterate over it in a specific sorted order. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 4 '11 at 22:51
    
@fuzzy lollipop - correct. I fixed my answer. –  Bozho Feb 4 '11 at 23:01

The obvious solution is to create your own class that implements the java.util.List interface and takes a Comparator as an argument to the constructor. You would use the comparator in the right spots, i.e. the add method would iterate through the existing items and insert the new item at the right spot. You would disallow calls to methods like add(int index, Object obj) and so on.

In fact, someone has to have created this already... a quick Google search reveals at least one example:

http://www.ltg.ed.ac.uk/NITE/nxt/apidoc/net/sourceforge/nite/util/SortedList.html

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The main difference between SortedSet and List is:

  • SortedSet keeps it's element in the right order, but you can't really access a specific element by index.
  • List allows indexed access, and arbitrary ordering of the elements. It also allows changing any element (by index or Iterator) to another element, without that the location changes.

You seem to want kind of a fusion of both: automatic sorting, and allowing (reasonable fast) index access. Depending on the size of data and how often indexed reading or adding new elements occur, these are my ideas:

  • a wrapped ArrayList, where the add method used a ListIterator to find the insertion spot, then inserting the element there. This is O(n) for insertions, O(1) for indexed access.
  • a wrapped LinkedList, where the add method used a ListIterator to find the insertion spot, then inserting the element there. (This still is O(n) for insertions (with sometimes quite smaller factor as ArrayList, sometimes even more), as well as indexed access.)
  • a modified binary tree keeping track of the sizes of both halves on each level, thus enabling indexed access. (This would be O(log n) for each access, but needs some extra programming, as it is not yet included in the Java SE. Or you find some library that can this.)

In any case, the interfaces and contracts of SortedSet and List are not really compatible, so you'll want the List part be read-only (or read-and-delete-only), not allowing setting and adding, and having an extra object (maybe implementing the Collection interface) for adding Objects.

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There is probably a good reason that there is no SortedList implementation in the JDK. I personally can't think of a reason to have one auto-sort. There are ambiguities with List because of duplicates, how do you order duplicates deterministically? There is SortedSet, and that makes sense because of the uniqueness.

Another thing is you only really care about order when traversing the list with an Iterator or for each loop, so calling Collections.sort() before any code that iterates would probably be more performant than trying to keep the list sorted all the time on every insertion.

If you have some very special situation where a auto-sorting List would be useful then one thing you might do is sub-class a List implementation and over-ride .add() to do a Collections.sort(this, comparator) that you pass into a custom constructor. I used LinkedList instead of ArrayList for a reason, ArrayList is a natural insertion sorted order List to begin with. It also has the ability to .add() at an index which is pretty useless if you want a constantly sorted List, that would have to be handled in someway that would probably be less than ideal. According to the Javadoc;

void    add(int index, Object element)

Inserts the specified element at the specified position in this list (optional operation).

So it just throwing UnSupportedOperationException would be acceptable.

Usually when you want to lots of inserts/removals and sorting you would use a LinkedList because of better performance characteristics given the usage of the `List'.

Here is a quick example:

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.LinkedList;

public class SortedList<E> extends LinkedList<E>
{
    private Comparator<E> comparator;

    public SortedList(final Comparator<E> comparator)
    {
        this.comparator = comparator;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(final E e)
    {
        final boolean result = super.add(e);
        Collections.sort(this, this.comparator);
        return result;
    }
}

Alternatively you could only sort when getting the Iterator and this would be more performance oriented if the sorted order was only really important when iterating over the List. This would cover the use case of the client code not having to call, Collections.sort() before every iteration and encapsulate that behavior into the class.

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;

public class SortedList<E> extends LinkedList<E>
{
    private Comparator<E> comparator;

    public SortedList(final Comparator<E> comparator)
    {
        this.comparator = comparator;
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<E> iterator()
    {
        Collections.sort(this, this.comparator);
        return super.iterator();
    }
}

Of course there would need to be error checking and handling to see if the Comparator was null or not and what to do if that was the case, but this gives you the idea. You still don't have any deterministic way to deal with duplicates.

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3  
why would you call sort on add, it's much better to insert at right position? –  bestsss Feb 4 '11 at 23:08
    
because the OP wanted it that way, maybe they don't know what the "right" position is, that is what the Comparator is for, to determine the "right" position for all items relative to the other items. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 4 '11 at 23:17

The only way to have any sorted structure with less than O(n) time to add/indexOf/remove/get element is using a tree. In that case operations generally have O(log2n) and traverse is like O(1).

O(n) is just a linked list.


Edit: inserting into linked list w/ binary search. For inserts operations, not using binary structure, and not small sizes, that should be optimal.

@Peter: There is the algo w/ O(log2n) compares (which are slow) to insert and O(n) moves. If you need to override LinkedList, so be it. But that's as neat as it can get. I keep the algorithm as clean as possible to be easily understandable, it can be optimized a little.

package t1;

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.ListIterator;
import java.util.Random;

public class SortedList {


    private static <T> int binarySearch(ListIterator<? extends Comparable<? super T>> i, T key){
        int low = 0;
        int high= i.previousIndex();
        while (low <= high) {
            int mid = (low + high) >>> 1;
            Comparable<? super T> midVal = get(i, mid);
            int cmp = midVal.compareTo(key);

            if (cmp < 0)
                low = mid + 1;
            else if (cmp > 0)
                high = mid - 1;
            else
                return mid;
        }
        return -(low + 1);  // key not found
    }

    private static <T> T get(ListIterator<? extends T> i, int index) {
        T obj = null;
        int pos = i.nextIndex();
        if (pos <= index) {
            do {
                obj = i.next();
            } while (pos++ < index);
        } else {
            do {
                obj = i.previous();
            } while (--pos > index);
        }
        return obj;
    }
    private static void move(ListIterator<?> i, int index) {        
        int pos = i.nextIndex();
        if (pos==index)
            return;

        if (pos < index) {
            do {
                i.next();
            } while (++pos < index);
        } 
        else {
            do {
                i.previous();
            } while (--pos > index);
        }
    }
    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    static  <T> int insert(List<? extends Comparable<? super T>> list, T key){
        ListIterator<? extends Comparable<? super T>> i= list.listIterator(list.size());
        int idx = binarySearch(i, key); 
        if (idx<0){
            idx=~idx;
        }
        move(i, idx);
        ((ListIterator<T>)i).add(key);
        return i.nextIndex()-1;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        LinkedList<Integer> list = new LinkedList<Integer>();
        LinkedList<Integer> unsorted = new LinkedList<Integer>();
        Random r =new Random(11);
        for (int i=0;i<33;i++){
            Integer n = r.nextInt(17);
            insert(list, n);
            unsorted.add(n);            
        }

        System.out.println("  sorted: "+list);
        System.out.println("unsorted: "+unsorted);
    }
share|improve this answer

Consider indexed-tree-map that I created while facing a similar problem, you will be able to access elements by index and get index of elements while keeping the sort order. Duplicates can be put into arrays as values under the same key.

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The best way to do this would be to override the add implementation of a list. I'm going to use a LinkedList to demonstrate it, as it allows for efficient insertion.

public boolean add(Integer e)
{
    int i = 0;
    for (Iterator<Integer> it = this.iterator(); it.hasNext();)
    {
        int current = it.next();
        if(current > e)
        {
            super.add(i, e);
            return true;
        }
        i++;
    }
    return super.add(e);
}

The above code creates a sorted list of integers, that is always sorted. It can easily be modified to work with any other datatype. However here you will have to avoid using the add(index, value) function, as that would obviously break the sorting.

Although people above suggested using Arrays.sort(), I would avoid that, as it can be a significantly less efficient approach, especially since the sort method must be called with every addition to the list.

share|improve this answer
    
This works but I'd suggest ArrayList with binarySearch. –  maaartinus Feb 4 '11 at 23:16
1  
Yeah, If I were to use a ArrayList, I'd definitely go with Binarysearch.However, I chose to go with a LinkedList, because I was going for efficient insertion. If efficient traversal were important, I'd do it differently. –  Varun Madiath Feb 4 '11 at 23:20
    
This solution is O(n^2) to insert n elements. –  rlibby Feb 4 '11 at 23:25
    
Yes, as oppsed to O(n^3) if arrays.sort uses insertion-sort, or O(n^2 log n) if it uses something like quick-sort. –  Varun Madiath Feb 5 '11 at 0:58
1  
The use of the iterator is good, but this solution will still require 2 scans of the list: one to find the insertion point, and then another to perform the insertion. It would be more efficient to use a ListIterator. I will post an example. –  Greg Brown Jan 14 at 19:38

The contract of the ListIterator interface makes it a bit cumbersome, but this method will perform the insertion using a single scan of the list (up to the insertion point):

private void add(Integer value) {
    ListIterator<Integer> listIterator = list.listIterator();

    Integer next = null;

    while (listIterator.hasNext()) {
        next = listIterator.next();

        if (next.compareTo(value) > 0) {                
            break;
        }
    }

    if (next == null || next.compareTo(value) < 0) {
        listIterator.add(value);
    } else {
        listIterator.set(value);
        listIterator.add(next);
    }
}
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I believe a Priority Queue will do the job.

Caveat (from the same doc page):

This class and its iterator implement all of the optional methods of the Collection and Iterator interfaces. The Iterator provided in method iterator() is not guaranteed to traverse the elements of the priority queue in any particular order. If you need ordered traversal, consider using Arrays.sort(pq.toArray()).

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1  
iteration of a PriorityQueue does NOT perserve order, and the most common reason to sort a List is to iterate over it in a specific sorted order. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 4 '11 at 22:51
    
A downvote based on an assumption that the OP did not explicitly state? Nice. Adding the caveat anyway... –  Santa Feb 4 '11 at 22:56
    
PriorityQueue does not implement the List interface. The OP explicitly states they want a List. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 4 '11 at 23:09

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