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Could some one please explain, What happens when a reference type is defined inside the value type. I write the following code:

namespace ClassInsideStruct
{
    class ClassInsideStruct
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            ValueType ObjVal = new ValueType(10);
            ObjVal.Display();

            ValueType.ReferenceType ObjValRef = new ValueType.ReferenceType(10);
            ObjValRef.Display();

            Test(ObjVal, ObjValRef);

            ObjVal.Display();
            ObjValRef.Display();

            Console.ReadKey();

        }

        private static void Test(ValueType v, ValueType.ReferenceType r)
        {
            v.SValue = 50;
            r.RValue = 50;
        }

    }

    struct ValueType
    {

        int StructNum;
        ReferenceType ObjRef;

        public ValueType(int i)
        {
            StructNum = i;
            ObjRef = new ReferenceType(i);
        }

        public int SValue
        {
            get { return StructNum; }
            set
            {
                StructNum = value;
                ObjRef.RValue = value;
            }
        }

        public void Display()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("ValueType: " + StructNum);
            Console.Write("ReferenceType Inside ValueType Instance: ");
            ObjRef.Display();
        }

        public class ReferenceType
        {

            int ClassNum;

            public ReferenceType(int i)
            {
                ClassNum = i;
            }

            public void Display()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Reference Type: " + ClassNum);
            }

            public int RValue
            {
                get { return ClassNum; }
                set { ClassNum = value; }
            }

        }

    }

}

Which outputs:

ValueType: 10
ReferenceType Inside ValueType Instance: Reference Type: 10
Reference Type: 10
ValueType: 10
ReferenceType Inside ValueType Instance: Reference Type: 50
Reference Type: 50

I'm curious to know, after calling the method Test(ObjVal, ObjValRef), how the values of ReferenceType is changed to 50 which resides inside the ValueType whose value is not changed?

share|improve this question
1  
The location of the class to the structure is irrelevant. It's just a nested type (and in C# -- unlike say Java or Scala -- it is not dependent upon the enclosing type). It is the same semantics as if ReferenceType was not nested. Don't confuse types and variables with a given type and instantiated objects of a given type. –  user166390 Feb 5 '11 at 7:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know for sure, but the compiler probably separates the code into a separate class and then just enforces the rules required. When you use a value type, the value is copied every time it is passed into a method. The reference to a reference type will get copied, but it refers to the same object. This same reference object will get changed while the value type that was copied will get changed. The original that you passed in will not reflect the changes on the copy.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like how "copy" is explicitly mentioned. This requirement preserves the structure-type calling semantics independent upon actual implementation. –  user166390 Feb 5 '11 at 7:25

Because Reference Types are Reference Types and Value Types are Value Types. No matter where they Reside.

And also Value type is not changing neither it is changing the Reference its holding. Its the Reference Type that gets changed(Read my words carefully).

i.e the underlying data at that address gets changed. The reference held by value type is still the same.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the start of this. Perhaps clarify to explains object t = Guid.New; f(t) –  user166390 Feb 5 '11 at 7:21
    
@pst its not New is Guid.NewGuid. And it returns a Value type Guid struct then it is boxed into object and the reference is given to t...BTW what is f() doing... –  Shekhar_Pro Feb 5 '11 at 9:17

Value inside value type is reference, that it is not changed. But value that is pointed by the reference could be easily changed.

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Reference types are passed into methods as a pointer, so modifying contents will modify the same location in memory. Value types are passed into methods by sending the value on the call stack.

share|improve this answer
1  
And a pointer is sent ... dum dum dum ... as value on the stack! This answer isn't incorrect, but it's important to realize the big "difference" is that the semantics are such that no copy/duplicate of a reference-type object is done when it's passed (this includes lifted value-types). Value-typed objects could be also passed by "reference" if it was such that a copy/clone was made to preserve semantics; the implementation is just the implementation. –  user166390 Feb 5 '11 at 7:19

when programming, it's important to understand that calling a method that takes arguments implies/includes/is the same as assigning values to those arguments. plus:

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    ValueType ObjVal = new ValueType(10);
    ObjVal.Display();

    ValueType.ReferenceType ObjValRef = new ValueType.ReferenceType(10);
    ObjValRef.Display();

    //call to Test(ObjVal, ObjValRef); replaced by the following 4 lines
    ValueType v = ObjVal;
    ReferenceType r = ObjValRef;
    v.SValue = 50;
    r.RValue = 50;

    ObjVal.Display();
    ObjValRef.Display();

    Console.ReadKey();

}

should give the same result as your example above. when you declare ValueType v = ObjVal; you are making a copy of the actual struct object, which means that v is a separate object all together. so changing the values of it's members won't affect ObjVal.

however, ReferenceType r = ObjValRef; makes a copy of a reference. So now there are two references, ObjValRef and r, pointing to the same object. Namely the object created when calling new ValueType.ReferenceType(10);

so when changing members of the object pointed to by any of these two references, this object changes, regardless of which pointer is used to perform the change.

oh, by the by.. a reference is just an address of an object. often this is a 32 bit number, but this changes from language to language, and from processor to processor.

and changing the reference copy in itself, e.g. r = null; won't affect the "original" reference ObjValRef, since r is a copy of ObjValRef, and not ObjValRef itself. it just appears as though they are the same, since they both point to the same object.

you can think of the actual object as a place (a park or some famous building, maybe "white mountain park") and the references as street signs pointing to this place. there can be many street signs pointing to the same place, but this doesn't mean that there are many "white mountain park". and this is the difference between value types and reference types.

share|improve this answer
    
I understood, why the value of 'r' is changed. I wanted to know why the 'RValue' of 'v' has been changed. However, thanks for the clarification of value type and reference type. –  NaveenBhat Feb 5 '11 at 7:43
    
well, actually it hasn't. RValue still has the same value, which is the address of an object. this object in turn has changed internally (its member ClassNum has been set to 50). and to be really precise, there are two RValue involved. one inside the struct object referred to as ObjVal, and another inside the struct object referred to as v. v only exists inside the method Test. when v is created, all the data from ObjVal is copied into v, and this includes RValue, which actually is a 32 bit integer, pointing to the address of an object of type ValueType.ReferenceType. –  davogotland Feb 5 '11 at 18:13

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