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Let's say I got this set of data. After sorting the distribution can be drawn out like below.

M=[-99  -99 -44.5   -7.375  -5.5    -1.666666667    -1.333333333    -1.285714286    0.436363636 2.35    3.3 4.285714286 5.052631579 6.2 7.076923077 7.230769231 7.916666667 9.7 10.66666667 16.16666667 17.4    19.2    19.6    20.75   24.25   34.5    49.5]

plot for the data

My question is how do I find out those values that are among the middle range and record the indices. Using normal distribution or anything else? Appreciate your help!

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1  
Your choice of what is the "middle" range is surely quite subjective. –  user85109 Feb 5 '11 at 13:55
    
instead of saying 'middle' range, I think it may be better to say 'a sequence of values which have limited variance'. Actually, the range should be changing with different data sets. –  view Feb 5 '11 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming your mid range is [-10 10] then the indices would be:

> find(-10< M & M< 10)
ans =

    4    5    6    7    8    9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18

Please note that you can acces the values also by logical indexing, like:

> M(-10< M & M< 10)
ans =

 Columns 1 through 15:

  -7.37500  -5.50000  -1.66667  -1.33333  and so on ...

And to get your mid range, just:

> q= quantile(M(:), [.25 .75])
q =

   -1.3214
   17.0917

> find(q(1)< M & M< q(2))
ans =

    8    9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20

Note also that M(:) is used here to ensure that quantile treats M as vector. You may adopt the convention that all vectors in your programs are column vectors, then most of the functions automatically treats them correctly.

Update:
Now, for a very short description of quantiles is that: they are points taken from the cumulative distribution function (cdf) of a random variable. (Now your M is assumed to be a kind of cdf, since its nondecreasing and can be normalized to sum up to 1). Now 'simply' a quantile .5 of your data 'means that 50% of the values are lower than this quantile'. More details on quantiles can be found for example here.

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Hi eat. Thanks for your answer. But can you please explain a bit more about [.25 .75] in the quantile function? Thanks a lot! –  view Feb 5 '11 at 18:46
    
@appi: Updated my answer. Please dont hesitate to add details on your question. But I think they need to be related to programming. There's a better forum to discuss on stats related issues on stats.stackexchange.com. Thanks –  eat Feb 5 '11 at 22:13
    
Thanks for your explanation and the website as well, eat. –  view Feb 6 '11 at 13:40

If you don't know a priori what your middle range is, but you know that you want to discard the outliers both at the start and at the end of our curve, and if you have the Statistics Toolbox you can do a robust linear regression to your data using ROBUSTFIT, and only keep the inliers.

M=[-99 -99 -44.5 -7.375 -5.5 -1.666666667 -1.333333333 -1.285714286 0.436363636 2.35 3.3 4.285714286 5.052631579 6.2 7.076923077 7.230769231 7.916666667 9.7 10.66666667 16.16666667 17.4 19.2 19.6 20.75 24.25 34.5 49.5];

%# robust linear regression
x = find(isfinite(M)); %# eliminate NaN or Inf
[u,s]=robustfit(x,M(x));

%# inliers have a weight > 0.25 (raise this value to be stricter)
inlierIdx = s.w > 0.25;
middleRangeX = x(inlierIdx)
middleRangeValues = M(x(inlierIdx))

%# plot with the regression in red and the good values in green
plot(x,M(x),'-b.',x,u(1)+u(2)*x,'r')
hold on,plot(middleRangeX,middleRangeValues,'*r')

the plot

middleRangeX =
  Columns 1 through 21
     4     5     6     7     8     9    10    11    12    13    14    15    16    17    18    19    20    21    22    23    24
  Column 22
    25
middleRangeValues =
  Columns 1 through 10
       -7.375         -5.5      -1.6667      -1.3333      -1.2857      0.43636         2.35          3.3       4.2857       5.0526
  Columns 11 through 20
          6.2       7.0769       7.2308       7.9167          9.7       10.667       16.167         17.4         19.2         19.6
  Columns 21 through 22
        20.75        24.25
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Thanks for your answer, Jonas! –  view Feb 6 '11 at 13:41
    
Hi Jonas. I followed your algorithm and modified my program. The M value I got is M=[-99 -44.50 -16.33 -1.66 -1.57 0.81 0.91 1.51 2.04 2.78 3.30 4.28 5.05 6.20 7.‌​07 7.23 7.28 7.91 9.70 10.66 10.66 16.16 17.40 19.20 19.60 20.75 24.25 Inf ]. The inlierIdx was set to 0.25. However, the middleRangeX and dimmdleRangeValues I got are all empty. The regression plot was shown right below the question because I don't know how to insert picture in the comment bar here. I tried to figure out the reason but failed. Can you please point out where I made the mistake? Thank you! –  view Feb 8 '11 at 17:52
    
@appi: interestingly, robustfit fails if there is Inf in the input. I have modified the code so that it'll work with your new data. –  Jonas Feb 8 '11 at 18:30
    
I tried your modified version. Yes, it works! Although I don't know why it is like so, yet I still want to thank you for the explanation. –  view Feb 10 '11 at 10:42
    
@appi: the second line (where I get the indices of the data vector with finite entries) allows to perform the fitting exclusively on the finite data. Or do you mean you don't understand why robust least squares work? Anyway, if it turns out that my solution is the best answer to your question, please consider accepting it. –  Jonas Feb 10 '11 at 14:13

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