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Here's a quickie for your RegEx wizards. I need a regular expression that will find groups of words. Any group of words. For instance, I'd like for it to find the first two words in any sentence.

Example "Hi there, how are you?" - Return would be "hi there"

Example "How are you doing?" - Return would be "How are"

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4  
Regular expressions shouldn't be used for parsing natural language. Can you think of a way to rephrase your question in a more abstract way - e.g. instead of "word" could you write "a sequence of letters not followed by a letter" for example? The word "word" can have different meanings depending on who you ask. For example is hwgzz a word? What about hasn't? 'n? '? a-b? -'a-? ? –  Mark Byers Feb 5 '11 at 11:10
    
What should be matched for "! How are you" ? –  Henk Holterman Feb 5 '11 at 11:36
1  
And what about: Hi, there, A café and Horse d'oeuvre –  Bart Kiers Feb 5 '11 at 11:39
1  
@Bart: Poor horse, though. –  Tim Pietzcker Feb 5 '11 at 18:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this:

^\w+\s+\w+

Explanation: one or more word characters, spaces and more one or more word characters together.

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still need to anchor it to the start. Probably, the OP isn't clear about that. –  Henk Holterman Feb 5 '11 at 11:35
    
Fair enough, edited. –  Rubens Farias Feb 5 '11 at 11:35
    
Actually, I should have been more clear about that, as I want to procedurally go through each bit of the text and find word groupings so that I can compare them to an array of keywords that I have. Anyway, you lead me in the correct direction. I'll post the code that I used as an answer because StackOverflow's comment section accepts no formatting of any kind (am I the only person that finds this stupid and annoying..?). Anyway, thank you! –  Sootah Feb 9 '11 at 12:52

Regular expressions could be used to parse language. Regular expressions are a more natural tool. After gathering the words, use a dictionary to see if they're actually words in a particular language.

The premise is to define a regular expression that will split out %99.9 of possible words, word being a key definition.

I assume C# is going to use a PCRE based on 5.8 Perl.
This is my ascii definition of how to split out words (expanded):

regex = '[\s[:punct:]]* (\w (?: \w | [[:punct:]](?=[\w[:punct:]]) )* )

and unicode (more has to be added/subtracted to suite specific encodings):

regex = '[\s\pP]* ([\pL\pN_-] (?: [\pL\pN_-] | \pP(?=[\pL\pN\pP_-]) )* )'

To find ALL of the words, cat the regex string into a regex (i don't know c#):

@matches =~ /$regex/xg

where /xg are the expanded and global modifiers. Note that there is only capture group 1 in the regex string so the intervening text is not captured.

To find just the FIRST TWO:

@matches =~ /(?:$regex)(?:$regex)/x

Below is a Perl sample. Anyway, play around with it. Cheers!

use strict;
use warnings;

binmode (STDOUT,':utf8');

# Unicode
my $regex = qr/ [\s\pP]* ([\pL\pN_-] (?: [\pL\pN_-] | \pP(?=[\pL\pN\pP_-]) )* ) /x;

# Ascii
# my $regex = qr/ [\s[:punct:]]* (\w (?: \w | [[:punct:]](?=[\w[:punct:]]) )* ) /x;


my $text = q(
  I confirm that sufficient information and detail have been
  reported in this technical report, that it's "scientifically" sound,
  and that appropriate conclusion's have been included
);
print "\n**\n$text\n"; 

my @matches = $text =~ /$regex/g;
print "\nTotal ".scalar(@matches)." words\n",'-'x20,"\n";
for (@matches) {
    print "$_\n";
}

# =======================================

my $junk = q(
Hi, there, A écafé and Horse d'oeuvre 
hasn't? 'n? '? a-b? -'a-? 
);
print "\n\n**\n$junk\n"; 

# First 2 words
@matches = $junk =~ /(?:$regex)(?:$regex)/;
print "\nFirst 2 words\n",'-'x20,"\n";
for (@matches) {
    print "$_\n";
}

# All words
@matches = $junk =~ /$regex/g;
print "\nTotal ".scalar(@matches)." words\n",'-'x20,"\n";
for (@matches) {
    print "$_\n";
}

Output:
**

I confirm that sufficient information and detail have been
reported in this technical report, that it's "scientifically" sound,
and that appropriate conclusion's have been included


Total 25 words
--------------------
I
confirm
that
sufficient
information
and
detail
have
been
reported
in
this
technical
report
that
it's
scientifically
sound
and
that
appropriate
conclusion's
have
been
included


**

Hi, there, A écafé and Horse d'oeuvre
hasn't? 'n? '? a-b? -'a-?

First 2 words
--------------------
Hi
there

Total 11 words
--------------------
Hi
there
A
écafé
and
Horse
d'oeuvre
hasn't
n
a-b
a-

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A bit overkill, but nicely detailed. Thanks! - Also, don't all of you just LOVE how RegEx always looks like gibberish? The one I made to grab HTML <tags> (everything between < and >) was: string pattern = "\\<[^>]*\\>"; –  Sootah Feb 9 '11 at 13:01

@Rubens Farias:

Per my comment, here's the code I used:

public int startAt = 0;

private void btnGrabWordPairs_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Regex regex = new Regex(@"\b\w+\s+\w+\b"); //Start at word boundary, find one or more word chars, one or more whitespaces, one or more chars, end at word boundary

        if (startAt <= txtTest.Text.Length)
        {
            string match = regex.Match(txtArticle.Text, startAt).ToString();
            MessageBox.Show(match);
            startAt += match.Length; //update the starting position to the end of the last match
        }
     {

Each time the button is clicked it grabs pairs of words quite nicely, proceeding through the text in the txtTest TextBox and finding the pairs sequentially until the end of the string is reached.

@sln: Thanks for the extremely detailed response!

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