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This question is my mistake. The code described below is being built well with no problem.


I have this class.

Vector.h

struct  Vector
{
    union
    {
        float   elements[4];
        struct
        {
            float   x;
            float   y;
            float   z;
            float   w;
        };                  
    };

    float   length();
}

Vector.cpp

float Vector::length()
{
  return x;  // error: 'x' was not declared in this scope
}

How to access the member x,y,z,w?

share|improve this question
1  
This compiles fine for me (with a semicolon after struct Vector) in g++ 4.4.0. See ideone.com/m5tVu. – TonyK Feb 5 '11 at 16:03
    
@TonyK I apology for my mistake. It's compiled well. I can't figure out why it was not compiled before... Sorry and thanks everyone! – Eonil Feb 6 '11 at 13:53
    
@Eonil Good question +1 – Josh C Nov 20 '13 at 21:25
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need an instance of your struct inside the anonymous union. I don't know exactly what you want to achive, but e.g. something like this would work:

struct Vector
{
  union
  {
    float elements[4];
    struct
    {
      float x, y, z, w;
    }aMember;
  };

  float length() const
  {
    return aMember.x;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
The error is occurring in a member function, where there's implicitly an instance. I think this is probably due to something else. – templatetypedef Feb 5 '11 at 11:17
    
@templatedtypedef: I was talking of the struct inside the union. And I updated my answer so please take away your downvote. – Karl von Moor Feb 5 '11 at 11:30
1  
The reason why you need a named member is that there are no anonymous structs in C++. union { ... }; defines an unnamed type and an unnamed object, but struct { ... }; defines only an unnamed type. I think the OP's code might even be illegal because the standard draft says that an anonymous union must not contain type declarations. – Philipp Feb 5 '11 at 12:48
1  
I'm kinda wondering.. I use anonymous structs for my math library as well, and there's no compiler error. struct Vector3{ union{ struct{ float x; float y; float z; }; float a[3]; }; }; I can access x, y and z either directly by their name or with a[0], a[1], a[2]. – Xeo Feb 5 '11 at 15:43
1  
@Eonil My code compiled successfull as C++ – what compiler are you using? – Karl von Moor Feb 6 '11 at 13:38

What you have created is not an anonymous member, but anonymous type (which is useless by itself). You have to create a member of your anonymous type. This concerns both your struct and your union.

Adjust the header like this:

struct  Vector
{
    union
    {
        float   elements[4];
        struct
        {
            float   x;
            float   y;
            float   z;
            float   w;
        } v;
    } u;

    float   length();
};

Now you can access your members like this:

u.elements[0] = 0.5f;
if(u.v.x == 0.5f) // this will pass
    doStuff();
share|improve this answer
1  
Why don't you want let him using anonymous unions? It's absolutely no problem and sometimes even recommended (devx.com/tips/Tip/12470) – Karl von Moor Feb 5 '11 at 11:27
    
@Polybos Good point, I didn't even know about anonymous unions until now :) – Fiktik Feb 5 '11 at 11:35

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