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This is the working code:

var test = function ()
{
    console.log(test.data);
};

test.data = 'hello';

test.set = function (data)
{
    test.data = data;
};

test.set('Test');
test();

This outputs Test to my javascript console. Now I was wondering, if there was a way to do it using something like this?

var test = {
    this: function ()
    {
        console.log(test.data);
    },

    data: 'hello',

    set: function (data)
    {
        test.data = data;
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
Functions are objects, but objects are not functions. Of course you can store functions as object properties but you can't make a plain object "callable". Or what do you actually want to achieve? What should be the advantage of your second approach? –  Felix Kling Feb 5 '11 at 12:02
    
I want to call function test.this() by using just test() –  Ragnis Feb 5 '11 at 12:07
    
@Felix I believe you're missing the point - I think he's trying to encapsulate all the information, and just having a neater/more organised approach. –  xil3 Feb 5 '11 at 12:16
    
Yes, that's what I was trying to do. –  Ragnis Feb 5 '11 at 12:22
    
I wish JavaScript could do this too!!!!! –  Brian McGinity Jul 16 '13 at 19:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As I have written in my comment, you cannot make an object "callable". You can however automate the process from your first example:

function extend(func, props) {
    for(var prop in props) {
        if(props.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            func[prop] = props[prop];
        }
    }
    return func;
}

and then call it with:

var test = extend(function(){
    console.log(test.data);
},
{
    data: 'hello',    
    set: function (data) {
        this.data = data;   // note that I changed it to `this.data`
    }
});

DEMO


That said, I think you should not use functions like that. It will be easier to understand if you just have a "normal" object and call every method with obj.method() instead of having obj().

At least you have to document this very carefully.

share|improve this answer
    
Where's the hasOwnProperty call? ;) –  Ivo Wetzel Feb 5 '11 at 12:18
    
@Ivo Wetzel: Well I assumed one would pass only plain objects anyway... but yes... extension of Object.prototype ... bla bla... (I hope one day they make the built in prototypes not extendable!)... fixed :) –  Felix Kling Feb 5 '11 at 12:19
    
That would a great thing, but I doubt they will ever do that :/ –  Ivo Wetzel Feb 5 '11 at 12:22

How about doing something like this:

function Test () {
  this.data = 'hello';
  this.set = function (data)
    {
        test.data = data;
    }
  this.log = function ()
    {
        console.log(test.data);
    }
}

var test = new Test ();
test.set('Test');
test.log();

This has the advantage you can create new instances easily.


If you just want a one-off, I would say your own suggestion is almost what you want:

var test = {
    log: function ()
    {
        console.log(test.data);
    },

    data: 'hello',

    set: function (data)
    {
        test.data = data;
    }
};

test.set('Test');
test.log();

But perhaps your question was how to avoid the ".log" part?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I want to avoid that ".log" part. –  Ragnis Feb 5 '11 at 12:04
    
So you want the log to essentially be in a constructor? –  xil3 Feb 5 '11 at 12:18

You can store any functions under properties in your object. And you can invoke them:

let f = { fun1: function () 
                {
                     return 1; 
                } 
        };
f.fun1();

is going to work perfectly. I am not sure if you can use 'this' as a property name as it is a keyword. Probably no problem with that, but it might be misleading.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually the second example was more like a pseudo code. –  Ragnis Feb 5 '11 at 12:03

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