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I need to be able to search customer accounts by multiple search fields. Right now, I have my search logic in my repository. The search logic includes some filtering that feels more like it belongs in the domain layer, but that would mean using something like IQueryable and I'm not sure I like that either.

For example, right now I have a search class that has all the fields by which the user can search:

public class AccountSearch
{
    public decimal Amount { get; set; }
    public string CustomerId { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
    public string CustomerName { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
}

Then, I have a domain level service that simply passes the search class off to the repository. I don't like it:

public class AccountsService : IAccountsService
{
    private readonly IAccountRepository _accountRepository;

    public AccountsService(IAccountRepository accountRepository)
    {
        _accountRepository = accountRepository;            
    }

    public IEnumerable<Account> Search(AccountSearch accountSearch)
    {
        return _accountRepository.Search(accountSearch);
    }
}

And then, I have all the filtering logic in my repository implementation:

public class AccountRepository : IAccountRepository 
{
    private AccountDataContext _dataContext;

    public AccountRepository(AccountDataContext entityFrameworkDataContext)
    {
        _dataContext = entityFrameworkDataContext;
    }

    public IEnumerable<Account> Search(AccountSearch accountSearch)
    {
        // My datacontext contains database entities, not domain entities. 
        // This method must query the data context, then map the database 
        // entities to domain entities.

        return _dataContext.Accounts
            .Where(TheyMeetSearchCriteria)
            .Select(MappedAccounts);
    } 

    // implement expressions here:
    // 1. TheyMeetSearchCriteria filters the accounts by the given criteria
    // 2. MappedAccounts maps from database to domain entities
}

Not sure if I should feel okay about this or if I should find another way to implement a search like this. What would you do in this situation?

share|improve this question
    
May I ask what's the point of AccountsService here? All it seems to do is wrap the IAccountRepository for seemingly no purpose. –  Matti Virkkunen Feb 5 '11 at 15:35
    
Correct. As usual, I have removed other methods for the sake of the question. And your question is the same as mine, except I would rather the search logic be in the domain service. I just don't know how best to implement it. –  Byron Sommardahl Feb 5 '11 at 15:37

3 Answers 3

There are a number of techniques you can use, the best of which will depend upon your particular scenario.

Rather than merely discussing search logic in terms of location (e.g. in a service or in a domain), it may be more helpful to draw a distinction between specification location and execution location. By specification location, I mean in what layers you specify which fields you are wanting to search on. By execution location, I mean immediate or deferred execution.

If you have several mutually exclusive types of searches (i.e. in scenario A you want to search by CustomerId, and in scenario B you want to search by CustomerName), this can be accomplished by creating a domain-specific repository with dedicated methods for each search type, or in .Net you might use a LINQ expression. For example:

Domain-specific search method:

_customers.WithName("Willie Nelson")

LINQ query on a repository implementing IQueryable:

_customers.Where(c => c.Name.Equals("Willie Nelson")

The former allows for a more expressive domain while the latter provides more flexibility of use with a slightly decreased development time (perhaps at the expense of readability).

For more complex search criteria needs, you can use the technique you have described of passing in a collection of search criteria (strongly typed or otherwise), or you can use the Specification Pattern. The advantage of the Specification Pattern is that it provides a more expressive, domain-rich query language. One example usage might be:

_customers.MeetingCriteria(
        Criteria.LivingOutsideUnitedStates.And(Criteria.OlderThan(55)))

The composition provided through the Specification Pattern can be provided through .Net's LINQ API as well, though with less control over specifying intention-revealing code.

With respect to execution time, repositories can be written to provide deferred execution by returning IQueryable, or by allowing LINQ expressions to be passed in to be evaluated by the repository method. For example:

Deferred query:

var customer =  (from c in _customers.Query()
                     where c.Name == "Willie Nelson"
                     select c).FirstOrDefault();

Executed by Query() method:

var customer =
   _customers.Query(q => from c in q
                           where c.Name == "Willie Nelson"
                           select c).FirstOrDefault();

The former Query() method which returns an IQueryable has the advantage of being slightly easier to test because the Query() can be easily stubbed to provide the collection operated upon by calling code, while the latter has the advantage of being more deterministic.

=====EDIT====

Inspired by gaearon's approach, I decided to amend my answer with a similar technique. His approach is somewhat of an inverted Specification Pattern, where the specification performs the actual query. This essentially makes it a query in its own right, so let's just call it that:

public class SomeClass
{
    // Get the ICustomerQuery through DI
    public SomeClass(ICustomerQuery customerQuery)
    {
        _customerQuery = customerQuery;
    }

    public void SomeServiceMethod()
    {
        _customerQuery()
            .WhereLivingOutSideUnitedStates()
            .WhereAgeGreaterThan(55)
            .Select();
    }
}

So, where's the repository you might ask? We don't need one here. Our ICustomerQuery can just get injected with an IQueryable which can be implemented however you like (perhaps an IoC registration that just returns the following for NHibernate:

 _container.Resolve<ISession>().Linq<Customer>()
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent answer. I refined my question a bit which might have some impact on your answer. Can you take another look? –  Byron Sommardahl Feb 5 '11 at 17:12
    
It looks like you are having to do your data entity -> domain entity mappings yourself. If that's the case, the last example would still work. You just need to use a Data Mapper within whatever component you use to back the IQueryable<Customer> you inject to ICustomerQuery. –  Derek Greer Feb 5 '11 at 17:47
    
Amazing answer, thanks. Glad to see you liked my approach. I used it in several LINQ to SQL and NHibernate apps and I really like the way it makes queries flexible. Applying Specification pattern in the fashion you described is cool as well, especially from syntax point of view. I'll try this one myself sometime. –  Dan Feb 5 '11 at 23:37

Why wouldn't you expose IQueryable from repository itself? This would allow any LINQ query to be run from requesting code.

public class AccountRepository : IAccountRepository 
{
    AccountContext context = new AccountContext ();

    public IQueryable<Account> GetItems ()
    {
        return context.Accounts;
    } 
}

You can make AccountSearch responsible for building up the query according to its own logic:

public class AccountSearch
{
    public decimal Amount { get; set; }
    public string CustomerId { get; set; }
    public string Address { get; set; }
    public string CustomerName { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string PostalCode { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string PhoneNumber { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }

    public IQueryable<Account> BuildQuery (IQueryable<Account> source)
    {
        var query = source.Where (a =>
            a.Amount == Amount);

        // you can use more twisted logic here, like applying where clauses conditionally
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty (Address))
            query = query.Where (a =>
               a.Address == Address);

        // ...

        return query;     
    }
}

Then use it from client code:

var filter = GetSearchFields (); // e.g. read from UI
var allItems = repository.GetItems ();

var results = filter.BuildQuery (allItems).ToList ();

This is just one of possible approaches but I like it because it allows complex logic in search filter class. For example, you might have a radio button in UI with different search types which in turn search by different fields. This is all expressible in AccountSearch when using this pattern. You can make some search fields optional as well, as I've done with Address in this example. After all, you take the responsibility to actually build the query from client code to AccountSearch which is best fit for it because it knows best about search conditions and their meaning.

share|improve this answer
    
Yessir, I like this a lot. I'm going to try it out and I'll let you know how it goes. –  Byron Sommardahl Feb 5 '11 at 16:34
    
Ok, we're almost there. As I was implementing it, I realized that I didn't mention that the repository has to map from database entities to domain entities. –  Byron Sommardahl Feb 5 '11 at 17:06
    
I've never considered this technique before, but I think I like this approach better than the classic Specification Pattern. It's sort of an inverted specification pattern, where the "criteria" does the search. Inspired by your example, I'm going to add a modified technique to my answer just to get this out of my head. +1 for you. –  Derek Greer Feb 5 '11 at 17:13

You can have your repository implement a generic Search which can receive arbitrary number of field names and values and do the search against them. That could be a simple Dictionary<string, object>. This of course only works when you're querying against a single table.

This way you won't have to pass AccountSearch class to repository (reduce dependency) and implement the search logic in domain layer (better contextualization), and still keep the data access logic in repository (better isolation).

It may not be as fast as what you have now but will let you have more control over the search process in general.

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