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Several times, I have come across the statement that, if you move a single function from one file to another file, Git can track it. For example, this entry says, "Linus says that if you move a function from one file to another, Git will tell you the history of that single function across the move."

But I have a little bit of awareness of some of Git's under-the-hood design, and I don't see how this is possible. So I'm wondering ... is this is a correct statement? And if so, how is this possible?

My understanding is that Git stores each file's contents as a Blob, and each Blob has a globally unique identity which arises from the SHA hash of its contents and size. Git then represents folders as Trees. Any filename information belongs to the Tree, not to the Blob, so a file rename for example shows up as a change to a Tree, not to a Blob.

So if I have a file called "foo" with 20 functions in it, and a file called "bar" with 5 functions in it, and I move one of the functions from foo into bar (resulting in 19 and 6, respectively), how can Git detect that I moved that function from one file to another?

From my understanding, this would cause 2 new blobs to exist (one for the modified foo and one for the modified bar). I realize a diff could be calculated to show that the function was moved from one file to the other. But I don't see how history about the function could possibly become associated with bar instead of foo (not automatically, anyway).

If Git were to actually look inside of single files, and compute a blob per function (which would be crazy / infeasible, because you'd have to know how to parse any possible language), then I could see how this might be possible.

So ... is the statement correct or not? And if it is correct, then what is lacking in my understanding?

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I don't think it tracks "functions" but rather "chunks of code" -- so if you have a 30-line function and break it into two 15-line functions, it will track that in much the same way as if you moved the whole function. Someone correct me if I'm wrong please. –  MatrixFrog Feb 6 '11 at 6:40
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My understanding (which may very well be wrong and that's why I'm asking) is that every file corresponds to at most one Blob. So splitting one func into 2 smaller funcs in the same file would simply cause your old Blob to be replaced with a new Blob. If that's correct, then it doesn't really track "chunks of code", because it never looks inside of a file. In other words, its smallest granularity is one whole file. –  Charlie Flowers Feb 6 '11 at 6:58
    
I ended up at this question because I noticed git doing this and was blown away. –  occulus Jun 6 at 9:40
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4 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This functionality is provided through git blame -C

The -C option drives git into trying to find matches between addition or deletion of chunks of text in the file being reviewed and the files modified in the same changesets. Additional -CC, or -CCC extend the search. Type git help blame for the manual page.

Try for yourself in a test repo with git blame -C and you'll see that the block of code that you just moved is originated in the original file where it belonged to.

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As a test, I created a repo with three files, and added a line to file1 then committed. I then moved that line to file2, and committed again. Then to file3, and committed. git blame -C10 file3 then showed the first commit where that line was added to file1, but I really wanted to see the most recent commit which moved that line (I.e., the commit which moved the line to file2.) Is there any way to accomplish that? I got some useful information by using git log -S'my interesting line', but still not quite what I'm after. –  Johann Apr 25 '13 at 20:21
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A bit of this functionality is in git gui blame (+ filename). It shows an annotation of the lines of a file, each indicating when it was created and when last changed. For code movement across a file, it shows the commit of the original file as a creation, and the commit where it was added to the current file as last change. Try it.

What I really would want is to give git log as some argument a line number range additionally to a file path, and then it would show the history of this code block. There is no such option, if the documentation is right. Yes, from Linus' statement I too would think such a command should be readily available.

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I just now saw gui blame for the first time. Nice. I'm starting to think that perhaps this is what Linus meant. Not that Git internally stores information saying that the function moved from one file to another, but that, given the information Git does store, you can determine that the function moved (like git gui blame does, or via a diff like I mentioned in the question). If so, this would mean my original understanding is right that it is all about Commits, Trees and Blobs, and Git never looks inside a file. But that's enough info to let you detect a function move via analysis. Perhaps. –  Charlie Flowers Feb 6 '11 at 16:04
    
Yes, I think this is it. The git backend does now nothing about the file contents (apart from maybe storing them a bit size-optimized as diffs), but the frontend tools have to do everything. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 6 '11 at 20:13
    
Wow, 3 years of git usage and I had never heard of git gui blame. This is exactly what I need! Thanks –  nus Apr 27 at 20:44
    
There just seems to be one problem... how do I walk through the history in chronological order? It's a bit top-posted... –  nus Apr 27 at 21:06
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git doesn't actually track renames at all. A rename is just a delete and add, that's all. Any tools who show renames reconstruct them from this history information.

As such, tracking function renames is a simple matter of analyzing the diffs of all files in each commit after the fact. There's nothing particularly impossible about it; the existing rename tracking already handles 'fuzzy' renames, in which some changes are done to the file as well as renaming it; this requires looking at the contents to the files. It would be a simple extension to look for function renames as well.

I don't know if the base git tools actually do this however - they try to be language neutral, and function identification is very much not language neutral.

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I wasn't referring to "function renames". Rather, I'm asking about the case of moving a subset of one file's text out of that file and into another file. –  Charlie Flowers Feb 5 '11 at 18:34
    
you are right but your comment is unclear and first few words would suggest (me) that you misunderstood Q, edit it or something please. on topic, git uses (system?) diff and that is all the power it has over this, it can "track" function rename but it's not particularly smart about it. It's basically just one line diff and you can track that thing. –  AoeAoe Aug 22 '12 at 19:55
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There's git diff that will show you that certain lines disappeared from foo and reappeared in bar. If there are no other changes in these files in the same commit, the change will be easy to spot.

An intellectual git client would be able to show you how lines moved from one file to another. A language-aware IDE would be able to correspond this change with a particular function.

A very similar thing happens when a file gets renamed. It just disappears under one name and reappears under another, but any reasonable tool is able to notice it and represent as a rename.

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Is there an extant client that allows a person to display the history of a function? –  William Pursell Feb 5 '11 at 20:07
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William: you should try "git gui blame path/to/filename.ext" or "git blame -CCCw path/to/filename.ext" (with the former having a pretty usable GUI and the latter including better diagnostics for hard moves and copies). Unfortunately, I think that there's no way to pass "-CCCw" options to git gui blame. –  Mikko Rantalainen Sep 1 '11 at 11:02
    
Actually "git gui blame" can be used to get results of "git blame -CCCw" by using git newer than 1.5.3 and selecting "Do full copy detection" from the right mouse button context menu after loading the file (I just checked the source file at /usr/share/git-gui/lib/blame.tcl). –  Mikko Rantalainen Sep 1 '11 at 11:08
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