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var array_of_functions = [
    first_function('a string'),
    second_function('a string'),
    third_function('a string'),
    forth_function('a string')
]

array_of_functions[0];

That does not work as intended because each function in the array is executed when the array is created.

What is the proper way of executing any function in the array by doing:

array_of_functions[0];  // or, array_of_functions[1] etc.

Thanks!

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1  
Does 'a string' need to be known at the time the array is populated, or can the caller of the function pass it in? –  Crescent Fresh Feb 5 '11 at 17:33
    
I'd love to get more detail on what you're trying to accomplish, because there might be a better way of handling this. –  jlbruno Feb 5 '11 at 17:36
1  
"Array of Functions" - or as we like to call it an object with methods –  symcbean Feb 5 '11 at 17:38
    
Don't you think you should give more details? There could be a better way to handle this.. –  IcyFlame May 12 '13 at 14:02

10 Answers 10

up vote 93 down vote accepted
var array_of_functions = [
    first_function,
    second_function,
    third_function,
    forth_function
]

and then when you want to execute a given function in the array:

array_of_functions[0]('a string');
share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you, all, for the amazingly quick, helpful responses. I should have thought of this solution sooner ("duh" moment). Coding while feeling tired can be counter-productive :-P –  Nick Feb 5 '11 at 17:50
1  
awesome answer. deserves more points –  whitebox Jun 7 '13 at 1:36

I think this is what the original poster meant to accomplish:

var array_of_functions = [
    function() { first_function('a string') },
    function() { second_function('a string') },
    function() { third_function('a string') },
    function() { fourth_function('a string') }
]

for (i = 0; i < array_of_functions.length; i++) {
    array_of_functions[i]();
}

Hopefully this will help others (like me 20 minutes ago :-) looking for any hint about how to call JS functions in an array.

share|improve this answer
    
This is just what I needed, as it allows me to change the parameter calls, assuming my functions don't all take the same parameters :P –  Jem Apr 16 '14 at 12:00

Or just:

var myFuncs = {
  firstFun: function(string) {
    // do something
  },

  secondFunc: function(string) {
    // do something
  },

  thirdFunc: function(string) {
    // do something
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Without more detail of what you are trying to accomplish, we are kinda guessing. But you might be able to get away with using object notation to do something like this...

var myFuncs = {
  firstFunc: function(string) {
    // do something
  },

  secondFunc: function(string) {
    // do something
  },

  thirdFunc: function(string) {
    // do something
  }
}

and to call one of them...

myFuncs.firstFunc('a string')
share|improve this answer
    
That's a syntax error? –  Bergi May 12 '13 at 14:06
    
True, I've updated. Thanks for the heads up @Bergi. –  jlbruno May 13 '13 at 14:24
    
@Leonardo: This was an unnecessary edit. I wonder why it was approved. –  Felix Kling May 23 '13 at 21:08
    
Thanks @FelixKling I rolled back his edit. –  jlbruno May 29 '13 at 14:15

This is correct

var array_of_functions = {
            "all": function(flag) { 
                console.log(1+flag); 
              },
                "cic": function(flag) { 
                console.log(13+flag); 
              }                     
        };

array_of_functions.all(27);
array_of_functions.cic(7);
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1  
Are you sure that this is the question which you wanted to answer on? It's not related. –  Bergi May 12 '13 at 14:07
1  
@Bergi Actually, it is. Replace the answer's opera with array_of_functions and you've got the same thing. How about now? –  Jesse May 12 '13 at 14:22
    
@Jesse thanks, now i have a idea with post the code, this is my first response. –  Leonardo Ciaccio May 12 '13 at 15:06
    
But OP had an array, while this is some object (with odd property names)? And what's the news of this answer, why not just upvote pjcabrera's or Robin's one? –  Bergi May 12 '13 at 15:44
    
Robin write undefined element firstFunc;.... NO CORRECT, then "firstFunc";"secondFunc";.... –  Leonardo Ciaccio May 23 '13 at 20:10

I would complement this thread by posting an easier way to execute various functions within an Array using the shift() Javascript method originally described here

  var a = function(){ console.log("this is function: a") }
  var b = function(){ console.log("this is function: b") }
  var c = function(){ console.log("this is function: c") }

  var foo = [a,b,c];

  while (foo.length){
     foo.shift().call();
  }
share|improve this answer

It's basically the same as Darin Dimitrov's but it shows how you could use it do dynamically create and store functions and arguments. I hope it's useful for you :)

var argsContainer = ['hello', 'you', 'there'];
var functionsContainer = [];

for (var i = 0; i < argsContainer.length; i++) {
var currentArg = argsContainer[i]; 

  functionsContainer.push(function(currentArg){
    console.log(currentArg);
  });
};

for (var i = 0; i < functionsContainer.length; i++) {
  functionsContainer[i](argsContainer[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
It is fine to add your answer no matter how many others there are. But it is preferable to add some explanation what is different/better about it than the others –  Bowdzone Mar 12 at 10:49
    
thaks for the hint! –  Mensur Grišević Mar 12 at 14:35

If you're doing something like trying to dynamically pass callbacks you could pass a single object as an argument. This gives you much greater control over which functions you want to you execute with any parameter.

function func_one(arg) {
    console.log(arg)
};

function func_two(arg) {
    console.log(arg+' make this different')
};

var obj = {
    callbacks: [func_one, func_two],
    params: ["something", "something else"];
};

function doSomething(obj) {
    var n = obj.counter
    for (n; n < (obj.callbacks.length - obj.len); n++) {
        obj.callbacks[n](obj.params[n]);
    }
};

obj.counter = 0;
obj.len = 0;
doSomething(obj); 

//something
//something else make this different

obj.counter = 1;
obj.len = 0;
doSomething(obj);

//something else make this different
share|improve this answer

Maybe it can helps to someone.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head lang="en">
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title></title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        window.manager = {
            curHandler: 0,
            handlers  : []
        };

        manager.run = function (n) {
            this.handlers[this.curHandler](n);
        };

        manager.changeHandler = function (n) {
            if (n >= this.handlers.length || n < 0) {
                throw new Error('n must be from 0 to ' + (this.handlers.length - 1), n);
            }
            this.curHandler = n;
        };

        var a = function (n) {
            console.log("Handler a. Argument value is " + n);
        };

        var b = function (n) {
            console.log("Handler b. Argument value is " + n);
        };

        var c = function foo(n) {
            for (var i=0; i<n; i++) {
                console.log(i);
            }
        };

        manager.handlers.push(a);
        manager.handlers.push(b);
        manager.handlers.push(c);
    </script>
</head>
<body>
<input type="button" onclick="window.manager.run(2)" value="Run handler with parameter 2">
<input type="button" onclick="window.manager.run(4)" value="Run handler with parameter 4">
<p>
<div>
    <select name="featured" size="1" id="item1">
        <option value="0">First handler</option>
        <option value="1">Second handler</option>
        <option value="2">Third handler</option>
    </select>
    <input type="button" onclick="manager.changeHandler(document.getElementById('item1').value);" value="Change handler">
</div>
</p>
</body>
</html>
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/* PlanetGreeter */

class PlanetGreeter {
    hello   : { () : void; } [] = [];
    planet_1 : string = "World";
    planet_2 : string = "Mars";
    planet_3 : string = "Venus";
    planet_4 : string = "Uranus";
    planet_5 : string = "Pluto";
    constructor() {
        this.hello.push( () => { this.greet(this.planet_1); } );
        this.hello.push( () => { this.greet(this.planet_2); } );
        this.hello.push( () => { this.greet(this.planet_3); } );
        this.hello.push( () => { this.greet(this.planet_4); } );
        this.hello.push( () => { this.greet(this.planet_5); } );
    } 
    greet(a: string) : void { alert("Hello " + a); }
    greetRandomPlanet() : void { 
        this.hello [ Math.floor( 5 * Math.random() ) ] (); 
    } 
} 
new PlanetGreeter().greetRandomPlanet();
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