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I initialize an array this way:

array = Array.new
array << '1' << '2' << '3'

Is it possible to do that in one step? If so, how?

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7  
+1 just for novel single-line repeated pushing. :) –  Phrogz Feb 5 '11 at 17:45
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8 Answers

up vote 73 down vote accepted

As others have noted, you can use an array literal:

array = [ '1', '2', '3' ]

You can also, for your example, use a range:

array = ('1'..'3').to_a  # parentheses are required
# or
array = *('1'..'3')      # parentheses not required, but included for clarity

For arrays of many whitespace-delimited strings, the easiest is this notation:

array = %w[ 1 2 3 ]

In general, you can pass a block to Array.new and use that to determine what the value for each entry will be:

array = Array.new(3){ |i| (i+1).to_s }

Finally, although it doesn't produce the same array of three strings as the other answers above, note also that you can use enumerators in Ruby 1.8.7+ to create arrays; for example:

array = 1.step(17,3).to_a
#=> [1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16]
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2  
Plus one for the detailed answer, even though I prefer splat over to_a ([*'1'..'3']). –  Michael Kohl Feb 5 '11 at 17:48
    
@MichaelKohl I agree; I was under the (mistaken) impression that you couldn't splat ranges in 1.8.6. I'll add that, thanks! Note that you don't need to splat within an array literal (unless you're compositing along with the splat). –  Phrogz Feb 5 '11 at 17:50
    
I know, it's just that I mostly use splat for that purpose (compositing that is) and I also like that it shows off what you end up with. –  Michael Kohl Feb 5 '11 at 19:39
1  
Also, the class method Array::[] can be used: Array[ "1","2","3"] #=> ["1","2","3"] (I don't think this method has anything to do with the array literal constructor). You can also use the top-level Kernel#Array (method name does look like a class name) Array(1..5) #=> [1,2,3,4,5] –  b1_ Jun 7 '12 at 11:19
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To prove There's More Than One Six Ways To Do It:

plus_1 = 1.method(:+)
Array.new(3, &plus_1) # => [1, 2, 3]

If 1.method(:+) wasn't possible, you could also do

plus_1 = Proc.new {|n| n + 1}
Array.new(3, &plus_1) # => [1, 2, 3]

Sure, it's overkill in this scenario, but if plus_1 was a really long expression, you might want to put it on a separate line from the array creation.

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If you have an Array of strings, you can also initialize it like this:

array = %w{1 2 3}

just separate each element with any whitespace

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Along with the above answers , you can do this too

    =>  [*'1'.."5"]   #remember *
    => ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]
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1  
In 1.9 you can also do it this way: >> [*?1..?5] #=> ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]. –  Michael Kohl Apr 21 '11 at 21:11
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To create such an array you could do:

array = ['1', '2', '3']
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You can initialize an array in one step by writing the elements in [] like this:

array = ['1', '2', '3']
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I suggest you start this way :

arr = Array.new

Then, it's pretty simple :

(0..2).each do |num|
  (num + 1) if 0 <= num && num <= 2
end.map { |num| 
  num.to_s 
}.each { |num_s|
  arr.push num_s
}

You're welcome

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Oneliner:

array = [] << 1 << 2 << 3   #this is for fixnums.

or

 a = %w| 1 2 3 4 5 |

or

 a = [*'1'..'3']

or

 a = Array.new(3, '1')

or

 a = Array[*'1'..'3']
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2  
why would anyone down vote this ....? –  pankajdoharey Nov 29 '11 at 13:15
6  
I didn't down vote it, but I'm guessing because this invoked three methods and incrementally grows the array, as opposed to [1,2,3] which does a single initialization. Also, yours is more characters. Also, you have created an array of Fixnums whereas the OP was asking about an array of strings. –  Phrogz Dec 9 '11 at 21:57
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