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In my application I'm storing all data in ApplicationData so that it can be easily shared between activities. My understanding is that this data should persist for the full life cycle of the application from the initial onCreate to the final onDestroy. That being the case, is there any need for me to store data in persistent storage during the onPause of all but the top activity?

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My understanding is that this data should persist for the full life cycle of the application from the initial onCreate to the final onDestroy.

Not exactly. Your process and custom Application class will remain around as long as Android lets it. Android may terminate the process outright to free up memory in an emergency. Not to mention that battery-powered devices may have their batteries go dead.

That being the case, is there any need for me to store data in persistent storage during the onPause of all but the top activity?

Only if you don't want the data. Use Application (or static data members) as a cache only.

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Thanks for the quick reply. So storing in SharedPreferences during onPause and restoring during onResume would be more advisable? I assume that accessing SharedPreferences is a relatively slow process, so I should save and store activity-relevant data from/to ApplicationData rather than treating SharedPreferences as my cache? –  Rok Feb 5 '11 at 21:11
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@Rok: "So storing in SharedPreferences during onPause and restoring during onResume would be more advisable?" -- well, that's certainly one option. A database is another. "I assume that accessing SharedPreferences is a relatively slow process, so I should save and store activity-relevant data from/to ApplicationData rather than treating SharedPreferences as my cache?" -- SharedPreferences is stored in memory and is persisted to flash when you commit edits. Hence, there is no particular need to copy data. –  CommonsWare Feb 5 '11 at 21:45
    
Thanks again. I have just one final question. I'll write the data to flash during onPause as I can see that this would be wise in case the application is unexpectedly purged. As I'll be copying to/from my data structures in ApplicationData (it has to be stored in more accessible ways than simple primitives), is there any reason for reading it during OnResume? If ApplicationData is only going to be purged if the process is purged, it should exist unless the whole process is terminated and if the whole process is terminated I'll be able to reload the data from flash. –  Rok Feb 5 '11 at 22:30
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@Rok: It is difficult to advise you. Generally, a cache should be implemented such that if the data is there, it is current, and if the data is not there, you load it from your more permanent store. –  CommonsWare Feb 5 '11 at 22:37
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