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Is there a nice way to stop the repetition of task from within the task itself when running in a ScheduledExecutorService?

Lets say, I have the following task:

Future<?> f = scheduledExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
    int count = 0;
    public void run() {
       System.out.println(count++);
       if (count == 10) {
           // ??? cancel self
       }
    }
}, 1, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

From outside, it is easy to cancel via f.cancel(), but how can I stop the repetition at the specified place? (Passing the Future through an AtomicReference is not safe, because there is a potential window when the scheduleAtFixedRate returns f late and the variable is set late too, and the task itself might already run, seeing a null in the reference.)

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Why not throw a StopIteration exception which you can catch to remove the call from the executor from the outside? As far as I know Callable's are unaware of whatever executor they're added to. –  Tim Feb 5 '11 at 21:46
    
the simplest and rather ugly way is throwing an exception :) –  bestsss Feb 6 '11 at 0:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When a repeating task throws an Exception or Error, it is placed in the Future and the task is not repeated again. You can throw a RuntimeException or Error of your choice.

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Yes, that is an option. I hope for a more elegant solution. –  akarnokd Feb 5 '11 at 22:33
2  
This is the best way to do it. If you want to make it "pretty" declare a class that extends RuntimeException that properly describes the purpose such as TaskComplete. –  Jed Wesley-Smith Feb 6 '11 at 0:05
    
@kd304, if you think: that's the very reason the exceptions are created, to signal an 'exceptional' state, I didn't see Peter's answer when I dropped the comment. This is a food (edit: good, darn misplaced fingers) answer :) –  bestsss Feb 6 '11 at 0:12
    
Won't doing this result in a memory leak in a long running process since the reference to the runnable will still be kept by the scheduledExecutor? –  Abhinav Sarkar Jun 19 '11 at 14:55

Here is another way, that's even Thread safe;

    final Future<?>[] f = {null};
    f[0]=  scheduledExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
        int count = 0;
        public void run() {

            System.out.println(count++);
            if (count == 10) {
                Future<?> future;
                while(null==(future = f[0])) Thread.yield();//prevent exceptionally bad thread scheduling 
                future.cancel(false);
                return;
                //cancel self
            }
        }
    }, 1, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
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Instead of using an anonymous inner class you can use a named class which can then have a property for the Future object you get from the Executor when you schedule a task.

abstract class FutureRunnable implements Runnable {

    private Future<?> future;

    /* Getter and Setter for future */

}

When you schedule a task you can then pass the Future to the Runnable.

FutureRunnable runnable = new FutureRunnable() {

    public void run() {
        if (/* abort condition */)
            getFuture().cancel(false);
    }

};
Future<?> future = executor.scheduleAtFixedRate(runnable, ...);
runnable.setFuture(future);

Maybe you will have to make sure, that the task is not executed before the Future has been set, because otherwise you will get a NullPointerException.

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1  
a NPE will effectively cancel the task just as fine :) –  bestsss Feb 6 '11 at 1:01

It seems like bad design for the Runnable to know anything about the executor it is running in, or to throw an error if reaching 10 is not an error state is a hack.

Can you do the loop to 10 outside of the scheduling and execution? This may require using a non-scheduling executor as you'd be scheduling them manually yourself.

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Scheduling is a must have. –  akarnokd Feb 5 '11 at 22:27

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