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I'm trying to use local_setting in Django 1.2, but it's not working for me. At the moment I'm just adding local_settings.py to my project.

settings.py

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.mysql', # Add 'postgresql_psycopg2', 'postgresql', 'mysql', 'sqlite3' or 'oracle'.
        'NAME': 'banco1',                      # Or path to database file if using sqlite3.
        'USER': 'root',                      # Not used with sqlite3.
        'PASSWORD': '123',                  # Not used with sqlite3.
        'HOST': 'localhost',                      # Set to empty string for localhost. Not used with sqlite3.
        'PORT': '',                      # Set to empty string for default. Not used with sqlite3.
    }
}

local_settings.py

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.mysql', # Add 'postgresql_psycopg2', 'postgresql', 'mysql', 'sqlite3' or 'oracle'.
        'NAME': 'banco2',                      # Or path to database file if using sqlite3.
        'USER': 'root',                      # Not used with sqlite3.
        'PASSWORD': '123',                  # Not used with sqlite3.
        'HOST': 'localhost',                      # Set to empty string for localhost. Not used with sqlite3.
        'PORT': '',                      # Set to empty string for default. Not used with sqlite3.
    }
}

The problem is that local_settings.py doesn't override settings.py. What is wrong?

share|improve this question
    
At the moment I read this question, there are three very different and all interesting answers. I was puzzled by the comments on Daniel's solution. It looks to me like there is no one-fits-all solution. Daniel's solution is simple and efficient. jano's solution is somehow cleaner in a way that makes sense only in already clean environments, at a small cost. John's solution is somehow more heavyweight but interesting in the most constrained environments. All in all, just pick the simplest that fit your use case. –  Stéphane Gourichon Jan 15 at 9:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 66 down vote accepted

You can't just add local_settings.py, you have to explicity import it.

At the very end of your settings.py, add this:

try:
    from local_settings import *
except ImportError:
    pass

The try/except block is there so that Python just ignores the case when you haven't actually defined a local_settings file.

share|improve this answer
    
Daniel, Django in the version 1.2 doesn't do that automatically? –  Michel Andrade Feb 5 '11 at 22:02
3  
Yeah grep -r "local_setting" django pretty much guarantees it's not "out of the box" behavior –  Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Feb 5 '11 at 22:24
4  
This approach means you have unversioned code running in EVERY location.It's an anti-pattern. –  pydanny Jan 31 '13 at 16:23
1  
@pydanny what alternative do you suggest? –  brodney Mar 18 '13 at 15:15
3  
See the answer below: stackoverflow.com/a/14545196/93270 –  pydanny Jul 26 '13 at 10:27

This is the best practice I think:

  • local_settings imports from settings
  • local_settings overrides settings specific to the local environment, especially DATABASES, SECRET_KEY, ALLOWED_HOSTS and DEBUG variables
  • pass to django management commands the flag --settings=local_settings

You could implement local_settings like this:

from settings import *

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.mysql', # Add 'postgresql_psycopg2', 'postgresql', 'mysql', 'sqlite3' or 'oracle'.
        'NAME': 'banco2',                      # Or path to database file if using sqlite3.
        'USER': 'root',                      # Not used with sqlite3.
        'PASSWORD': '123',                  # Not used with sqlite3.
        'HOST': 'localhost',                      # Set to empty string for localhost. Not used with sqlite3.
        'PORT': '',                      # Set to empty string for default. Not used with sqlite3.
    }
}

Typically you write settings.py in a way that it is suitable for development purposes. In a production environment you use --settings=local_settings to override some of the settings as necessary.

Touching the stock settings file as little as possible also makes it easier to upgrade your django version.

share|improve this answer
2  
I like this approach. Touching the empty settings file as little as possible makes it easier to properly configure new settings when you upgrade your django version. –  m000 Apr 2 '13 at 9:59
2  
This should be the accepted answer, read the comments in the accepted one for reasons why that one is problematic ("unversioned code running in EVERY location"). –  eggonlegs Feb 18 '14 at 6:07
3  
I cannot see how this is different from the accepted answer. This local_settings should not be versioned, either. If it would be, it is possible for developers to accidentally change local_settings on the production machine. –  GergelyPolonkai Jun 18 '14 at 8:50

Since the topic resurfaces routinely let me summarise why you might want to consider this approach:

  • a dumb settings file is very fast and easy to change; especially in a production environment. No python required: any idiot can jump in and change the database password in a file which just lists names and values; especially compared to a complex python settings file full of mysterious dangerous BIGCAPS names.

  • the application settings should be completely separated from the application code. You can put a config.ini outside the repository root and never again worry about a repo pull clobbering your settings, or your personal settings polluting the repo, or that clever code in your settings.py not making it into the repo to everyone else's advantage.

This won't apply to small projects, but on bigger projects I've concluded that the local_settings strategy just doesn't cut it; over time enough application programming creeps in that it gets hard to handle; primarily as settings become derivative and/or codependent. There can be good justifications for settings to react according to the local settings which forces the import of a local_settings file to creep up toward the middle of settings.py. I find things start to get messy as that happens.

My current solution is to use a config file, I dub it "local.ini". It holds only those values which do actually change between deployed instances. There is no code: they are just values and booleans:

[global]
domain = 127.0.0.1:8000
database_host = 127.0.0.1
database_name = test_database
debug = Yes
google_analytics_id = UA-DEV-1
payments = testing
use_cdn = No

With this in place I can treat the settings.py like any other piece of application code: tweak it, check it in, and deploy it without having to worry about testing against whatever code might be lurking in a local_settings python code. My settings.py is free of race conditions that come up when later settings depend on local settings, and I can switch features on and off writing easy-to-follow linear code. No more hurriedly tweaking the local_settings file when I've forgotten to add some new value, and no more daves_local_settings.py and bobs_local_settings.py files creeping into the repository.

from ConfigParser import RawConfigParser
parser = RawConfigParser()

APPLICATION_ROOT = path.abspath(path.dirname(__file__))
parser.readfp(open(path.join(APPLICATION_ROOT, 'local.ini')))

# simple variables
DATABASE_HOST = parser.get('global', 'database_host')
DATABASE_NAME = parser.get('global', 'database_name')

# interdependencies
from version import get_cdn_version
CDN = 'd99phdomw5k72k.cloudfront.net'
if parser.getboolean('global', 'use_cdn'):
    STATIC_URL = '/{}/static/{}/'.format(CDN, get_cdn_version())
else:
    STATIC_URL = '/static/'


# switches
payments = parser.get('global', 'payments')
if payments == 'testing':
    PAYMENT_GATEWAY_ENDPOINT = 'https://api.sandbox.gateway.com'
else:
    PAYMENT_GATEWAY_ENDPOINT = 'https://api.live.gateway.com'

If you encounter a BOFH, like I had on one occasion, he got particularly excited about the ability to stick the local.ini into the /etc directory as /etc/ourapp.ini and so keep the application directory itself a pure repository export. Sure you could do that with a local_settings.py but the last thing he wanted to do was mess with python code. A simple config file he could handle.

share|improve this answer
    
What makes you want to use a different syntax (and require a parser) as opposed to a regular Python file? This is why we namespace. –  Joost Apr 29 at 9:02
    
Because a regular Python file will be executed, whereas a config file is a very simple collection of dumb settings; there is no temptation to get it doing "smart" things, and any idiot (eg non-python people, or yourself 12 months later) can work out how to update the basic settings without any fear of breaking everything. –  John Mee Apr 29 at 11:22
    
The syntax is practically identical though. I guess it's a matter of preference. –  Joost Apr 29 at 11:31
    
Like I said, there's little payoff on small projects; but once your settings.py grows beyond 50 lines, or the import local_settings.py is no longer at the very bottom, you'll see more value. –  John Mee Apr 29 at 12:09

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