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I'm working on a evolutionary simulation model implemented in Java and ran into a key object-orientation design issue which I can't seem to work out. The problem can be summarized as follows:

I have a base abstract class Player and two concrete subclasses, Signaller and Receiver:

abstract class Player
{
    Strategy[] strategies;
    double fitness;
    ...
}

class Signaller extends Player
{
    double quality;
    ....
}

class Receiver extends Player
{
    double[] weights;
    int chosenChannel;
    ....
}

Now I need classes which represent collections of Signallers and Receivers and I am constrained to using arrays to store them. There are methods common to both population types, but also specific methods for a signaller populations or for a receiver population.

Conceptually, I would need something like this:

abstract class Population
{
    Player[] members;

    void mixUpPopulation() {...}
    Strategy[] getMeanStrategies() {...}
    double getMeanFitness() {...}
    ...
}

class SignallerPopulation extends Population
{
    Signaller[] members;
    ...
}

class ReceiverPopulation extends Population
{
    Receiver[] members;

    double[] getChannelPreferences() {...}
    ...
}

I have thought of two basic ways of achieving this:

  1. Have the class hierarchy as described above.
    Problem: How can the Player[] in the superclass and also the Signaller[] or Receiver[] in the subclasses refer to the same collection of objects?

  2. Make the base class generic:

class Population <T extends Player>
{
    ...    
    T[] members = (T[])new Object[popSize];
}

Problem: How do I implement the methods specific to each of the population types?

I would appreciate your insights into those problems or maybe suggestions of other ways of tackling the problem.

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2  
arrays and generics will make trouble I think. try to compile the suggested second statement ... why not using ArrayList<T> ? –  Karussell Feb 5 '11 at 23:43
1  
I am constrained to using arrays to store them - why? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 6 '11 at 0:01
    
Hi @Alex,If you have solved it,could you post the working example.im finding it difficult to understand this example.your help will be appreciated. –  Deepak Feb 6 '11 at 10:43
    
@Karussell You are right about arrays and generics, there is no elegant way of dealing with this combination. That's why I decided not to use it. –  Alex Feb 6 '11 at 20:57
    
@Paŭlo Ebermann The reason why I need to use arrays is more complicated and it is out of the scope of my question. In a nutshell, my simulation will run faster than with another type of collection. –  Alex Feb 6 '11 at 20:59
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the design 1 as in your question, but instead of storing an array in the abstract base class you add an abstract protected method (e.g. getMembers()) that will be implemented in the subclasses to return the actual array as an array of Players.

Alternatively, you can make the abstract base class generic, and derive the subclasses with the appropriate types:

abstract class Population<T extends Player>
{
    T[] members;

    void mixUpPopulation() {...}
    Strategy[] getMeanStrategies() {...}
    double getMeanFitness() {...}
    ...
}

class SignallerPopulation extends Population<Signaller>
{
    public SignallerPopulation(int popSize) { members = new Signaller[popSize]; }
    ...
}

class ReceiverPopulation extends Population<Receiver>
{
    public ReceiverPopulation(int popSize) { members = new Receiver[popSize]; }
    double[] getChannelPreferences() {...}
    ...
}
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In this case the T[] still needs to be managed (at least instantiated) by the subclasses, since you can't create an array of a generic type (without using Reflection and unchecked casts afterwards). –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 6 '11 at 0:00
    
I edited my answer to show how you could create the array. –  Medo42 Feb 6 '11 at 0:19
    
I decided to go with the first option and the suggestion you've made (with the abstract method in the superclass) worked fine. I'll give a sketch of my code in an answer below. Thanks a lot for helping out. –  Alex Feb 6 '11 at 21:02
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Remove the members from Population and add an abstract getter-method for members to it (public abstract Player getMember(int i) and public abstract int getNumPlayers() or something similar). Subclasses are required to implement the getter. This way you will still have access to the Player part of XYPopulation members in Population.

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Thanks for your suggestion (basically, same as 1st option proposed by @Medo42). I used it and it works fine. –  Alex Feb 6 '11 at 21:06
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I went with the design suggested by @Medo42 (his first option) and @LumpN. The only cast required was when setting the array, but that wasn't problematic. I am giving the outline of the code here, maybe someone will find it helpful.

abstract class Population
{
    protected abstract Player[] getMembers();  
    protected abstract void setMembers(Player[] members);    

    void mixUpPopulation() {...}
    Strategy[] getMeanStrategies() {...}
    double getMeanFitness() {...}
    ...
}

class SignallerPopulation extends Population
{
    Signaller[] members;

    protected Player[] getMembers() 
    {
        return this.members;
    }

    protected void setMembers(Player[] members) 
    {
        this.members = (Signaller[]) members; //required cast
    }
    ...
}

class ReceiverPopulation extends Population
{
    Receiver[] members;

    protected Player[] getMembers() 
    {
        return this.members;
    }

    protected void setMembers(Player[] members) 
    {
        this.members = (Receiver[]) members; //required cast
    }

    double[] getChannelPreferences() {...}
    ...
}
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