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Is it possible to exclude certain fields from being included in the json string?

Here is some pseudo code

var x = {
    x:0,
    y:0,
    divID:"xyz",
    privateProperty1: 'foo',
    privateProperty2: 'bar'
}

I want to exclude privateProperty1 and privateproperty2 from appearing in the json string

So I thought, I can use the stringify replacer function

function replacer(key,value)
{
    if (key=="privateProperty1") then retun "none";
    else if (key=="privateProperty2") then retun "none";
    else return value;
}

and in the stringify

var jsonString = json.stringify(x,replacer);

But in the jsonString I still see it as

{...privateProperty1:value..., privateProperty2:value }

I would like to the string without the privateproperties in them.

SOLUTION

Here is the final replacer function that worked

replacer = function(key, value)
{

  if (key=="div"||key=="canvas"||key=="ctx")
  {
      return undefined;
  }

  else return value;


}

NOTE: the value undefined is not within any quotes. I had initially tried with "undefined" and it did not work.

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/208105/… –  Jared Farrish Feb 6 '11 at 0:07
3  
instead of returning "none" return undefined. –  JoeyRobichaud Feb 6 '11 at 0:09
    
I saw that question and I don't want to delete properties as it affects my current application. I am trying to save the object to a file and the application still has the live object so deleting a property will make it useless. Another option is I could clone the object, delete fields and then stringify the clone object. –  Nilesh Feb 6 '11 at 0:10
    
Hey Joe, that was great. The undefined did the trick. Thanks. I will update the question –  Nilesh Feb 6 '11 at 0:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The Mozilla docs say to return "undefined" instead of "none":

https://developer.mozilla.org/En/Using_JSON_in_Firefox

EDIT

Actually, return undefined, not "undefined".

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/rZ5Px/

function replacer(key,value)
{
    if (key=="privateProperty1") return undefined;
    else if (key=="privateProperty2") return undefined;
    else return value;
}

var x = {
    'x':0,
    'y':0,
    'divID':"xyz",
    'privateProperty1': 'foo',
    'privateProperty2': 'bar'
};

alert(JSON.stringify(x, replacer));

Here is a duplication method, in case you decide to go that route (as per your comment).

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/644sJ/

function omitKeys(obj, keys)
{
    var dup = {};
    for (key in obj) {
        if (keys.indexOf(key) == -1) {
            dup[key] = obj[key];
        }
    }
    return dup;
}

var x = {
    'x':0,
    'y':0,
    'divID':"xyz",
    'privateProperty1': 'foo',
    'privateProperty2': 'bar'
};

alert(JSON.stringify(omitKeys(x, ['privateProperty1','privateProperty2'])));

EDIT - I changed the function key in the bottom function to keep it from being confusing.

share|improve this answer
    
@Nilesh - See my edit. –  Jared Farrish Feb 6 '11 at 0:31

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