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From prelude:

foldl1: it takes the first 2 items of the list and applies the function to them, then feeds the function with this result and the third argument and so on.

Why is not possible to write something like this?

foldl1 (==) [6, 6, 6]
foldl1 (\x y -> x == y) [6, 6, 6]
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3  
Just a hunch but applying the equality operator on the first two yields a boolean. I doubt it makes any sense to compare a boolean to an integer. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 6 '11 at 0:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: Antal points out that my reasoning was incorrect. Here is the relevant part of the comment that gives the real reasoning (I feel bad taking this verbatim, but this answer was accepted so I can't delete it):

The reason this doesn't work is that the type of foldl1 is (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a, but the type of (==) is Num a => a -> a -> Bool. Since Bool isn't a Num, (==) type doesn't match a -> a -> a, and so the application of foldl1 is rejected. If it were accepted, you'd end up with a situation where you were trying to do True == 6, but the type system never gets you get that far in the first place.

Original answer (latter reasoning incorrect):

== will take two Ints and return a Bool. After the first iteration your example list becomes [True, 6]. It then tries to compare True to 6 which fails.

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1  
Your first sentence is correct, but True is not cast to 1 in Haskell! –  drvitek Feb 6 '11 at 0:18
    
@marcog: thanks, it makes perfect sense. Shame on me not thinking about it! :) –  gremo Feb 6 '11 at 0:18
    
@drvitek Thanks. My practical haskell isn't strong. –  marcog Feb 6 '11 at 0:24
    
marcog: No worries - this is a good note if OP ever recreates this functionality in another language and wonders why, for example, this code would give incorrect results on [6,6,1]. I would hate to track down that bug... –  drvitek Feb 6 '11 at 0:25
4  
This still isn't quite right. The list [True,6] can't exist in Haskell, because it's ill-typed; even if it could, this would make things fail at runtime, not compile-time. The reason this doesn't work is that the type of foldl1 is (a -> a -> a) -> [a] -> a, but the type of (==) is Num a => a -> a -> Bool. Since Bool isn't a Num, (==) type doesn't match a -> a -> a, and so the application of foldl1 is rejected. If it were accepted, you'd end up with a situation where you were trying to do True == 6, but the type system never ets you get that far in the first place. –  Antal S-Z Feb 6 '11 at 18:12

If you want to check if all of the elements of a list are equal, a quick solution is

allEqual [] = True --(edit: this case is not necessary as pointed out by sepp2k)
allEqual xs = all (== head xs) xs

Somebody will write a more elegant way to do this, I am sure, but this is serviceable.

Edit: Thanks to sepp2k for the suggestions.

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1  
No need for the first case since and [] is true anyway. Also and . map is all. –  sepp2k Feb 6 '11 at 0:20
1  
sepp2k: I updated after I realized that without seeing your comment first. I guess we were thinking of the same thing. It is clever to realize that the first case is not needed, however; I was thinking that head would fail in this case –  drvitek Feb 6 '11 at 0:22
2  
It would if it were evaluated. But if xs is empty, all never calls the function, so head never needs to be evaluated. –  sepp2k Feb 6 '11 at 1:15
    
@sepp2k: Yep, I realized that after puzzling over your comment for a while. It appears I have yet to fully let lazy thinking take over... –  drvitek Feb 6 '11 at 2:51

Here is another version:

allEqual xs = and $ zipWith (==) xs (tail xs)
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1  
Inspired by your answer, there's also this: allEqual xs = tail xs == init xs –  Dan Burton Feb 6 '11 at 22:55
    
That is cool. –  Landei Feb 7 '11 at 7:20
    
@Dan: You might want to use drop 1 instead of tail, so this will work on empty lists as well. –  Axman6 Feb 9 '11 at 8:55
    
Wouldn't help, because in that case it fails when calling init. –  Landei Feb 9 '11 at 12:39

If you want to use a fold, I would suggest this modification:

allEqual xs = foldr (\x acc -> x == head xs && acc) True xs

This is very similar to the already-suggested all approach. Note that both this and the all approach can work on infinite lists (as long as the answer is False).

For very long finite lists, in very rare cases you might get better performance out of a strict left fold:

allEqual xs = foldl' (\acc x -> acc && x == head xs) True xs

But the right fold is generally better for this problem, since (in this implementation) it only performs a number of folding steps equal to length $ takeWhile (== head xs) xs. The left fold will perform length xs folding steps every time.

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You can write allEqual xs = foldl' (flip $ (&&).(== head xs)) True xs for better obfuscation. –  Landei Feb 6 '11 at 22:19

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