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The standard System.Windows.Forms.TabControl component draws a border around the TabPages it contains. If you set its Dock to Fill, these borders run up to the edge of the parent control, but they're still there, taking up screen space.

In Visual Studio, if you dock two windows in the same place, you get a TabControl-like set of tabs along the bottom, but no borders along the sides.

Is it possible to get a TabControl to display its TabPages in this manner, with no wasted screen space at the sides? If possible, I'd like to avoid solutions that involve painting the control myself.

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Have you played around with the Margin property? –  Eric Aug 10 '09 at 5:37
    
@Simon, You can use Phil Wright's solution and dynamically set the width of your TabControl at runtime to take into account different user settings. –  Stewbob Aug 14 '09 at 16:24
    
@Stewbob: If I have to do anything at runtime to take into account different user settings, then it's not the solution I'm after. –  Simon Aug 17 '09 at 8:39
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using the standard .NET tab control, this isn't directly possible. What is the ultimate goal for this? Are you trying to simulate the same type of tabbed-MDI style display as Visual Studio? If that's the case, there are several third-party solutions available - some open source and some commercial.

The other responses about using the Anchor property in combination with setting the size so it is just a bit larger than the actual window might work, but I think it might look a bit odd visually. It should work regardless of the theme and accessibility settings, but you may end up having to programmatically set the size to be a few pixels larger than the parent.

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Instead of using the Dock property you should try using the Anchor to anchor each of the four sides. Then you need to position the TabControl so it is positioned a couple of pixels bigger on all sides that the parent. That way the borders are hidden because they cannot be drawn when behind the parent control.

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Will that work identically irrespective of the user's theme and accessibility settings? –  Simon Feb 3 '09 at 13:33
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<Grid>
   <TabControl Name="tabControl1" >
       <TabItem Header="tabItem1" Name="tabItem1">
          <Grid />
       </TabItem>
       <TabItem Header="tabItem2" Name="tabItem2">
          <Grid />
       </TabItem>
       <TabItem Header="tabItem3" Name="tabItem3">
          <Grid />
       </TabItem>
  </TabControl>
</Grid>
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You have realized that the question targets winforms? –  Tim Schmelter Feb 4 '13 at 16:23
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  1. Remove the height and width attributes from TabControl
  2. Set horizontal and vertical alignment to stretch

e.g. won't stretch;

<TabControl Height="373" Width="609" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Name="tabControl1" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"  VerticalContentAlignment="Stretch" HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch">

e.g. will stretch;

<TabControl HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" Name="tabControl1" VerticalAlignment="Stretch"  VerticalContentAlignment="Stretch" HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch">
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There is no HorizontalAlignment property in TabControl, or am i missing something? –  Tim Schmelter Feb 4 '13 at 16:21
2  
I think this answer is for WPF, not WinForms –  didibus Aug 21 '13 at 21:37
    
It even doesn't work in WPF. –  AmiT Jun 24 at 7:01
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Anchor the left and right sides of the control with the width set to the width of the parent control.

childControl.Anchor = Anchor.Left|Anchor.Right; childControl.Width = parentControl.Width;

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Do not Dock the TabControl. Stretch it out on the designer so its left and right edges extend beyond the window.

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Will that work identically irrespective of the user's theme and accessibility settings? It seems to me that if their theme is different, the distance beyond the edges might need to be different. –  Simon Feb 9 '09 at 9:32
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