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I have a Android Widget, Configuration Activities, and a heavily used Android Service full of functions. I want to maintain global application state/status that can be referenced from any of the above locations. The state I am referring to is application domain specific status. For example STARTED, LEVEL1, LEVEL2 etc. So I would like to know the following:

1) What are the advantages of Global Singleton for keeping this state/status vs. subclassing the Android Application and using it as the Singleton?

2) I want the state to be a recoverable singleton. So I need to save it off when the App gets shutdown, process terminated. Where is the right place to save off the overall application state? the terminate method on Application can be overridden but its not really guaranteed to get called. So I am looking also for the point at which to save off the application state. Its not clear to me. The Activity is not the global application, neither is the widget nor the service, so where can I tell that the application is being shutdown/terminated and saveoff the application state.

3) Is their anything wrong with initializing the state in Application.onStart()?

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there is no Application.onStart() –  techiServices Feb 6 '11 at 1:03
    
correct I was referring to Application.onCreate() –  Androider Feb 6 '11 at 2:23

2 Answers 2

Why not use the Service? That is a good place to keep live state. AFAIK it is guaranteed that Service is a singleton, and onCreate() and/or onStartCommand() offer places appropriate for initializations. I'm unclear any guarantee that onDestroy() gets called, but the docs seem to say it will:

"A service can be both started and have connections bound to it. In such a case, the system will keep the service running as long as either it is started or there are one or more connections to it with the Context.BIND_AUTO_CREATE flag. Once neither of these situations hold, the service's onDestroy() method is called and the service is effectively terminated." ref

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Well the first question is really where the custom application state should reside. Suppose your app has n services? would you make one such service the one that kept the shared state? I think not. Take the general case 1 app, n services, y widgets. It seems that this shared state of the app really belongs with the application and not any of its components right? –  Androider Feb 6 '11 at 1:36
    
keep in mind this is about sharing and not just storing. True you can store anywhere and retrieve anywhere, but this does not provide synched sharing. Its also not logically a preference. –  Androider Feb 6 '11 at 1:38
    
> make one such service the one that kept the shared state? I think not. Why not? According to the docs "A Service is an application component representing either an application's desire to perform a longer-running operation .. to supply functionality for other applications to use." It is a singleton, long-running, and available to other components or even other apps. Seems a natural component type all ready to keep (and persist) "custom application state." –  DJC Feb 7 '11 at 18:08
    
Why pick it over the Android App subclass? And who wants to incur the costs of calling a service just to get a state? The application is available to everything that has a context without binding. –  Androider Feb 9 '11 at 5:57

1) What are the advantages of Global Singleton for keeping this state/status vs. subclassing the Android Application and using it as the Singleton?

If by "Global Singleton" you mean a static data member, there are no advantages or disadvantages of significance either way, IMHO.

2) I want the state to be a recoverable singleton. So I need to save it off when the App gets shutdown, process terminated. Where is the right place to save off the overall application state?

Every time it changes, more or less.

The Activity is not the global application, neither is the widget nor the service, so where can I tell that the application is being shutdown/terminated and saveoff the application state.

You aren't told. Hence, you save it every time it changes. Your static data member, Application object, or whatever is a cache for persistent data -- everything else is subject to utter destruction. (insert evil maniacal laugh here)

3) Is their anything wrong with initializing the state in Application.onCreate()? (corrected)

I assume you mean onCreate(). You are on the main application thread, and so I/O might be kicked off in onStart() but should occur on an AsyncTask or other background thread.

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3) correct I was referring to onCreate –  Androider Feb 6 '11 at 2:04
    
3) part of the initialization refers is obtained by doing registerReceiver(null, Intent) to get system values. Would this fit in onCreate as far an ANR, or would it make more sense to pass an initialization request Intent to a service? –  Androider Feb 6 '11 at 2:06
    
@Androider: registerReceiver() should take microseconds and should not be a problem. –  CommonsWare Feb 6 '11 at 2:07
    
2) is it enough to save off new state in static variable of Application subclass (or Singleton), or do I also need to store it persistently using something like shared preferences. So what I am asking here is do I really need to do a syncronized method call on the static data and both update the value in the singleton and at the same time update its value in the shared preferences? –  Androider Feb 6 '11 at 2:09
    
@Androider: " do I really need to do a syncronized method call on the static data and both update the value in the singleton and at the same time update its value in the shared preferences?" -- I have no idea. It is your data. You can do with it whatever you want. The time gap between when the data logically changes and when those changes get persisted represents a period of time in which those changes will be lost if things go sideways. Typically, since persisting data takes time, you spawn an AsyncTask or something to do the persisting and hope for the best. –  CommonsWare Feb 6 '11 at 2:14

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