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We have a User Defined Data Type of YesNo which has an which is an alias for char(1). The type has a bound Rule (must be Y or N) and a Default (N).

The aim of this is that when any of the development team create a new field of type YesNo the rule and default are automatically bound to the new column.

Rules and Defaults have been deprecated and won't be available in the next a future version of SQL Server, is there another way to achieve the same functionality?

I should add that I'm aware that I could use CHECK and DEFAULT constraints to replicate the functionality of the bound Rule and Defalut objects, however these would have to be applied at each usage of the type, rather than getting the functionality 'for free' by using a UDT which has a bound Rule and Default.

The post relates to a database that backs an existing application, rather than a new development, so I'm aware that our use of UDT's is less than optimal.

I suspect the answer to the question is 'No', however normally when features are deprecated there's usually an alternative syntax that can be used as a drop in replacement so I wanted to pose the question in-case someone knew of an alternative.

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I think you misread the article. CREATE RULE and CREATE DEFAULT are deprecated in favor of specifying DEFAULTs and CHECK rules inside the CREATE TABLE or ALTER TABLE statements. –  Bill Feb 6 '11 at 1:10
    
which is where I always declare mine. –  Mitch Wheat Feb 6 '11 at 1:16
    
...the defaults that is –  Mitch Wheat Feb 6 '11 at 9:42
    
Edit to reflect the correct deprecation timescale. –  Adam Jones Feb 6 '11 at 10:42
2  
@Bill I understand that's what they want me to use, that's the point of my post. Using constraints requires the developer to add the constraints to each table each time the UDT is used, whereas using a UDT with a bound Rule and Default you get that for free each time the type is used, which removes a point of potential human error in our development process. –  Adam Jones Feb 6 '11 at 10:51
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Default and check constraints...

CREATE TABLE foo (
   col1 int...
   YesNo char(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT ('N')
                   CONSTRAINT CK_foo_YesNo CHECK (YesNo IN 'Y', 'N'))
   col2 ...
   )

Personally, I tend not to use UDTs (last time was SQL Server 6.5 IIRC) because there is no ALTER TYPE in case anything changes...

As for deprecation..

First mentioned in CREATE RULE for SQL Server 2005. So, we were told 6 years and 3 releases ago

For SQL Server 2000...

"Rules, a backward compatibility feature, perform some of the same functions as check constraints. CHECK constraints, created using the CHECK keyword of ALTER or CREATE TABLE, are the preferred, standard way..."

The same applies to CREATE DEFAULT, the object not the constraint

That's 11 years ago

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I'd love to get rid UDT's too but in this case they're useful and are part of this particular database which has been around for a long time. I know that I could update each use of the type to have a constraint and a default, however that means applying a constraint and a default each time the type is used, what I was asking is if there is a way of achieving what we have at the moment which is having a type that comes with a default value and that can only accept certain values without anding code at each individual use. –  Adam Jones Feb 6 '11 at 11:24
    
@Adam Jones: not quite what you want, but have you thought about using non-null bit and changing to Y or N in the client? This way, it's native datatype with "built-in" constraint of only 2 values. Ad interim, you could use a computed column to provide Y or N for reading: you only have to change your writes to bit. –  gbn Feb 6 '11 at 11:31
    
Thanks for the suggestion, it's a possibility for the future. At some point i'd like to strip out all the UDT's and changing the YesNo to be a non null bit would be on the TODO list. The question was really a point of curiosity. I'd looked for a 'drop in' replacement for our current functionality and couldn't find anything, I put the question on here in case there was something I'd missed. Unfortunately I suspect the short answer to my question is 'No'. –  Adam Jones Feb 6 '11 at 14:53
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"Rules and Defaults have been deprecated and won't be available in the next version of SQL Server"

1) As far as I know that is not true. You cannot suddenly break 99.9% of TSQL out there!

2) Also, even if it were true (and I strongly believe it is not), deprecated does not mean removed in the next release, simply that a feature should no longer be used in new code.

Do you have an official link to any such announcement?

User @gbn seems to think I am defending the use of deprecated constructs. I am not.

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CREATE RULE for SQL Server 2005. You've only had 6 years and 3 releases. For SQL Server 2000... "Rules, a backward compatibility feature, perform some of the same functions as check constraints. CHECK constraints, created using the CHECK keyword of ALTER or CREATE TABLE, are the preferred, standard way..." That's 11 years... –  gbn Feb 6 '11 at 9:10
    
@gbn: your point is? –  Mitch Wheat Feb 6 '11 at 9:30
    
Addressing these in your answer: "Do you have an official link to any such announcement?" and "As far as I know that is not true. You cannot suddenly break 99.9% of TSQL out there!". You've had bags of time to adjust... –  gbn Feb 6 '11 at 9:39
    
@gbn: I have no idea what you are talking about. I'm referring to anything 'deprecated'. I personally don't use Rules. I declare my constraints inline (as I've said elsewhere in this question) –  Mitch Wheat Feb 6 '11 at 9:40
    
When OP said "Rules and Defaults have been deprecated.." this refers to rule objects (mentioned in previous comment) and default objects, not default constraints associated with tables which you and I and 99.9%+ of TSQL uses. If you've never used them or didn't know about them then fair enough. MS does provide information on deprecation and discontinued features in BOL, normally with 3 versions notice. –  gbn Feb 6 '11 at 9:56
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