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I'm currently struggling to understand the Ms-RL (Microsoft Reciprocal License). I read the license four times now, but still I am unsure of the following things: (Regarding especially 3A and 3E of the license)

If I use the library, without ANY change, do I have to publish the source code of my application?

Is it enough to add the Ms-RL to my own license, mentioning its validity for the used library?

UPDATE:

Do I have to publish my whole application then under the Ms-RL?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From Wikipedia:

This Microsoft license allows for distribution of derived code so long as the modified source files are included and retain the Ms-RL. The Ms-RL allows those files in the distribution that do not contain code originally licensed under Ms-RL to be licensed according to the copyright holder's choosing. This is equivalent to the CDDL, EPL or LGPL (GPL with a typical "linking exception").

i would say this license is LGPL like.

For any file you distribute that contains code from the software (in source code or binary format), you must provide recipients the source code to that file along with a copy of this license, which license will govern that file.

As long as your source files do not contain code from the software with this license, you don't have to apply the MS-RL to those files. The license is still attached to the "files" containing MS-RL code.

Typically you would license the entire software any way you wish, then add an exception for the files containing MS-RL code.

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and i could be wrong.

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This sounds different than Gamecat's answer. He says even in compiled state I have to use an Ms-RL or similar license. –  StampedeXV Feb 24 '12 at 10:10
    
I think Gamecat and I are talking about different things. Your binary files with MS-RL code must have a MS-RL compatible license. Your other software files can be under any license you want. Typically you would keep the MS-RL code in its own DLL. Your other code would make calls to the MS-RL DLL file. –  Greg Mar 1 '12 at 8:50
    
That's exactly what I was hoping. But wasn't sure if this was only counting for the one dll having the MS-RL code or if it was for the whole application. To me that wasn't exactly clear. –  StampedeXV Mar 5 '12 at 18:29

A link to the full license text.

And to quote the requested paragraphs:

  • 3(A) Reciprocal Grants- For any file you distribute that contains code from the software (in source code or binary format), you must provide recipients the source code to that file along with a copy of this license, which license will govern that file. You may license other files that are entirely your own work and do not contain code from the software under any terms you choose.

Translation: For each file that uses files under the Ms-RL, you need to provide the source and a copy of the license.

  • 3(E) If you distribute any portion of the software in source code form, you may do so only under this license by including a complete copy of this license with your distribution. If you distribute any portion of the software in compiled or object code form, you may only do so under a license that complies with this license.

Translation: If you distribute any part of code (as source) under the Ms-RL, you can only do this with the Ms-RL. You need to include a copy of the license. If you distribute only compiled or object code, you can do that with any license that is compatible with the Ms-RL.

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