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Okay, so I have done a ton of research on this and have been pulling my hair out for days trying to figure out why the following code leaks:

[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;
UIImage *comicImage = [self getCachedImage:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@%@",@"http://url/",comicNumber,@".png"]];
self.imageView = [[[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:comicImage] autorelease];
[self.scrollView addSubview:self.imageView];
self.scrollView.contentSize = self.imageView.frame.size;
self.imageWidth = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%f",imageView.frame.size.width];
[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;

Both self.imageView and self.scrollView are @propety (nonatomic, retain) and released in my dealloc.. imageView isn't used anywhere else in the code. This code is also run in a thread off of the main thread. If I run this code on my device, it will quickly run out of memory if I continually load this view. However, I've found if I comment out the following line:

[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;
UIImage *comicImage = [self getCachedImage:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@%@",@"http://url/",comicNumber,@".png"]];
self.imageView = [[[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:comicImage] autorelease];
//[self.scrollView addSubview:self.imageView];
self.scrollView.contentSize = self.imageView.frame.size;
self.imageWidth = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%f",imageView.frame.size.width];
[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;

Memory usage becomes stable, no matter how many times I load the view. I have gone over everything I can think to see why this is leaking, but as far as I can tell I have all my releases straight. Can anyone see what I am missing?

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3 Answers 3

You autorelease your imageview upon init, and then retain it by assigning it to self.imageView, then adding it as a subview retains it again. So, when the pool is drained, it gets a release message. When it is removed as a subview it gets a release message. Then if you dealloc, it gets a third release message. One of those three is not occurring. You say it's released in dealloc, so that's not it. The autorelease pool can be trusted to drain at some point, so that's not it. I would either make sure to remove it as a subview at some point, or get rid of one of your retain calls.

And.. shouldn't this:

self.imageView = [[[UIImageView initWithImage:comicImage] autorelease];

be this?:

self.imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:comicImage];
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1  
Let me answer myself: YES, you should alloc UIImageView and initWithImage the allocation. Autoreleasing is optional. Better is to manage your retains and releases yourself. –  jakev Feb 6 '11 at 2:57
    
:) If you don't have alloc then your don't own the object and should not release it, other way around you are the owner and you are responsible for releasing the object. Autorelease pools are drained on every runloop so there is very little possibility for memory issues there (under-released objects). –  ludesign Feb 6 '11 at 3:02
1  
autoreleasing everything is an indication you don't understand objective c memory management, and while it might work for now, you'll get into trouble later on. Also, sending an init message to a class you haven't alloced is another bad sign. Unless Nathan knows precisely what he's doing and has a good reason, he should create his imageView as shown above. –  jakev Feb 6 '11 at 3:08
    
THe missing +alloc was bogus, though. And, quite specifically, the autorelease pools can be a huge source of memory pressure bugs. –  bbum Feb 6 '11 at 3:08
    
Sorry, I had removed the alloc in one of my tests right before I pasted here.. I do have the alloc. I fixed the code above. –  Nathan Feb 6 '11 at 3:13

When calling this line:

[self.scrollView addSubview:self.imageView];

self.imageView is retained by its super view and when you don't need imageView anymore you should call:

[self.imageView removeFromSuperview];

This will call release on self.imageView.

p.s. You can track your ref counts by calling

NSLog(@"RefCount: %d", [self.imageView retainCount]);

add this line above

self.imageView = [[[UIImageView initWithImage:comicImage] autorelease];

to track the refCount. (Better option is to use Instruments but you already know that :))

Edit: It is a good practice to [[alloc] init] objects when you have retain properties like this:

UIView *myView = [[UIView alloc] init];
self.myCustomView = myView;
[myView release];

Otherwise you'll get self.myCustomView retained twice.

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DON'T track retain counts with [self.imageView retainCount] as this is a terrible way to debug. The value for retainCount can change wildly especially for a subview, and you will be misled into thinking you know what's going on. –  jakev Feb 6 '11 at 2:53
    
@JakeVA - Yes this is true, the best way is using the debugger for this and instruments to discover leaks. As I don't know how much the author is familiar with debugging I suggested to just print out the retainCount, very bad practice indeed. Thanks for pointing this out. :) –  ludesign Feb 6 '11 at 2:58
    
The retain count is useless. And that last line of code is nonsense. –  bbum Feb 6 '11 at 3:07
    
@bbum - Yes, English is not my native language but can't you read? I said it twice in my post and as a comment or you just love to down vote? Anyway, thank you for your comment. –  ludesign Feb 6 '11 at 3:10
    
"You can track your ref counts by calling" indicates that you are advising that retainCount is useful in some contexts. It certainly isn't useful here. –  bbum Feb 6 '11 at 3:14
[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES;

Fine.

UIImage *comicImage = [self getCachedImage:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@%@",@"http://url/",comicNumber,@".png"]];

Don't call methods get* anything unless you are following standard Cocoa patterns (which this method is not). Just call it cachedImage:.

self.imageView = [[[UIImageView initWithImage:comicImage] autorelease];

You are missing an alloc call; that should be:

self.imageView = [[[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:comicImage] autorelease];

Or (if you want to avoid the autorelease pool; probably not an issue here):

UIImageView *iV = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithImage:comicImage];
self.imageView = iV;
[iV release];

[self.scrollView addSubview:self.imageView];
self.scrollView.contentSize = self.imageView.frame.size;
self.imageWidth = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%f",imageView.frame.size.width];
[UIApplication sharedApplication].networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO;

All fine. If there is a leak, it is either because imageView isn't released in dealloc or something else is hanging on to it (scrollView not being released, perchance?). Instruments can do a wonderful job of tracking down leaks, etc....


What the "leaks" tool looks for is objects that no longer have any references to them. In this case, it is quite likely that you have references remaining.

Frankly, given that you are easily able to reproduce the growth through repetition, Heapshot analysis will quite likely be highly applicable.

I wrote up a guide on Heapshot analysis a bit ago.

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Thanks for the tip about get* in the method, I didn't even think about that.. but it makes sense. –  Nathan Feb 6 '11 at 3:34
1  
Also, where does one turn when instruments don't turn up anything? I know that I am leaking.. And as far as I can tell the addSubview line is what is causing it. I will crash from low memory if I continually load this view (and using instruments I can see my app is constantly growing in memory use). However, the Leaks instrument never detects any leaks. –  Nathan Feb 6 '11 at 4:29

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