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I used to be a programmer but now do periodic "scripting." I'm trying to create an Ajax-based game.

I have a .php file with the following javascript:

if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
 XMLHttpRequestObject = new XMLHttpRequest();
} else if ( window.ActiveXObject ) {
 XMLHttpRequestObject = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.SML.HTTP");
}

Then whenever I want to use a request I have, for example:

if ( XMLHttpRequestObject ) {
 XMLHttpRequestObject.open("GET","gameinfo.php?cmd=setgame&game=" + arg);
 XMLHttpRequestObject.onreadystatechange = function() {
  // handler  ...
 }
 XMLHttpRequestObject.send(null);
}                

I don't understand why I need to always be sure the XMLHttpRequest object exists before I refer to it. Didn't I create it? How could it not exist? Is this just good coding practice or is there some real risk?

OK, I'm convinced to try jQuery. But if I were sticking to pure javascript, would this be safe?

if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
 XMLHttpRequestObject = new XMLHttpRequest();
} else if ( window.ActiveXObject ) {
 XMLHttpRequestObject = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.SML.HTTP");
} else {
 alert("Sorry but it looks like this game won't work in your browser.");
}

Then whenever I want to use a request I have, for example:

XMLHttpRequestObject.open("GET","gameinfo.php?cmd=setgame&game=" + arg);
XMLHttpRequestObject.onreadystatechange = function() {
 // handler  ...
}
XMLHttpRequestObject.send(null);
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4 Answers 4

The way that your IFs are structured, there's some potential, logically, for you to not create anything. Basically you're looking for if window.XMLHttpRequest exist OR IF window.ActiveXObject exists, you create your request object. But if neither of those instances exist, you get nothing.

So, what may perhaps be a better check is to put a check afterwards to alert the user "Hey, I can't seem to find any kind of XMLHttpRequestObject, so I can't do much from here.".

When can this happen? Beats me, but the simple fact is that the way your logic is laid out, it POTENTIALLY can happen.

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Its because of the problems dealing with cross-browser implementations of XMLHttpRequest (XHR). The first block of code is basically feature detecting, if you encounter a really esoteric browser that doesn't even have an XHR then you can handle it gracefully. –  Aatch Feb 6 '11 at 3:09
    
Doesn't it seem better to put the worst case check once at the time I'm creating the object and then assume it exists elsewhere? –  Mike Coble Feb 6 '11 at 3:23

Just to start out here: Use jQuery it abstracts messy things with bad cross-browser compatibility like that.

That first block of code is for feature detection, since IE handles XMLHttpRequests differently to other browsers, you need to figure out which object to use.

The check is there on the off-chance that the compatibility code (the if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {... stuff) has missed a case, otherwise you'll get nasty errors.

I will repeat myself, because this is very important, use jQuery. It is hands down the most powerful javascript library out there. For an example, the request you want to do is

$.get("gameinfo.php", 
    {cmd: "setgame", game: arg}, 
    function () { 
       //Success function
    }
);

And that handles all of the cross-browser stuff transparently and just works. (There are more in-depth function on jQuery if you need them though)

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1  
+1 for "use JQuery." Or, if you want to be really high-performance, you could try GWT. (If you like JQuery and GWT, you can even use GWTQuery). –  StriplingWarrior Feb 6 '11 at 3:11
    
I've avoided jQuery probably because it doesn't look familiar. What's with the '$'? But OK, I'm convinced to give it a go. –  Mike Coble Feb 6 '11 at 3:27
    
if you dont like the '$' you dont have to use it. You can turn on compatibility mode and just use 'jQuery' instead, or you can assign it to your own variable with window.myvar = window.jQuery –  Aatch Feb 6 '11 at 3:31
    
@Mike Coble: $ is nothing special. It is a valid variable name in JavaScript (because $ is a valid character for variable names in JavaScript (unlike other languages)). So it is not jQuery related. It is probably just less known and hence less used. –  Felix Kling Feb 6 '11 at 4:22

It's possible that both conditions are wrong.

But if you're creating an ajax-based game, I realllly encourage you to check out jquery or another js framework...

Actually, I did exactly the same few years ago. I started building an ajax game, from scratch, using raw javascript. Then I discovered jQuery... It's really fast to learn.

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How do you want then to catch it up if it exists? Are you sure that it will be 100% created? Checked all browsers? Checked all possibilities?

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