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I am using Ruby on Rails 3 and I would like to initialize my class. In my case I need to set params[:name] ||= {} every time I use that class.

How to do that?


UPDATE I

Is it possible to simplify things using something like

class A
  def initialize
    params[:name] ||= {}
  end
end

?


UPDATE II

I forgot to say that in my class I have to use that parameter as an hash:

class A
  def initialize
    # code to initialize params[:name] ||= {}
  end

  def action_name
    params[:name][:ronda] = "Jack"
  end
end

If I try to set params[:name][:ronda] without inizialize params[:name] ||= {}, I get an error. For this I have to initialize the class.

I the above code I can do

  def action_name
    params[:name] ||= {}
    params[:name][:ronda] = "Jack"
  end

and it will work, but since I have to use that for every action in the class, I would like to refractor code setting the params[:name] at once.

share|improve this question
    
Are you looking for something different than def initialize? –  Beerlington Feb 6 '11 at 3:17
    
I think of no, but I don't know how to initialize a class at all. Where can I find documentation about? –  user502052 Feb 6 '11 at 3:19
    
You can't just do params[:name] without initializing the variable params first. Pan's answer is probably closer to what you'll want. –  Beerlington Feb 6 '11 at 3:30
    
I re-updated the question. –  user502052 Feb 6 '11 at 3:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the initialize function to set defaults:

class A
  def initialize
    @params = {name: {}}
  end

  def params
    @params
  end
end

A.new.params # {:name => {}}

You can also default upon access this way:

class A
  def initialize
    @params = {}
  end

  def params
    @params[:name] ||= {}
    @params
  end
end

A.new.params # {:name => {}}

The difference is that the first example adds the :name parameter upon creation (A.new) while the second example adds it upon access (A.new.params).

share|improve this answer
    
I updated the question. –  user502052 Feb 6 '11 at 3:26
    
My solution is still applicable. You need to have params initialized to {} before you can set name. Initializing a class is equivalent to calling .new on it. –  Pan Thomakos Feb 6 '11 at 3:34
    
I re-updated the question. –  user502052 Feb 6 '11 at 3:38
    
My answer still works. Just use the first example or modify it slightly so that it fits your use case. The idea is still the same. Either put initialization code into initialize or into the parameter accessor. Pick one that fits your needs and use that. –  Pan Thomakos Feb 6 '11 at 3:42
    
In order to have less code as possible, there is a way to simplify things using something like in "UPDATE I"? –  user502052 Feb 6 '11 at 3:44

Just do

@params = {
    :name => {
        :ronda => {}
    }
}

in initialize.

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