Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I create the base and derived class in the same directory without specifying any package they compile fine, but adding them to a package leads to an error in derived class saying that it is not able find he symbol of base class. This error is frustrating since I have been working in c before , why all these shenanigans in Java?.

package Testpackage; // If I comment this then derived class compiles fine

public class Test_class{

    int x,y;


    public static Integer angle;


    public Test_class(int a,int b)
{
    x = a;
        y = b;
}


    public Integer product()
{
    return x*y;
}
}

*************Derived class ****************
package Testpackage;  // If I comment this then it compiles fine

public class Derived_class extends Test_class{

       Integer vol;
      Test_class I = new Test_class(1,2); 
        public Derived_class(){
          super(9,10);
      vol = 0;
   }

       public Integer volume()
   {
         vol = this.product();

         return vol;
   }

}


********* output *************
assa@dasman-laptop:~/Testpackage$ javac Derived_class.java 
Derived_class.java:4: cannot find symbol
symbol: class Test_class
public class Derived_class extends Test_class{
                                   ^
Derived_class.java:7: cannot find symbol
symbol  : class Test_class
location: class Testpackage.Derived_class
          Test_class I = new Test_class(1,2); 
          ^
Derived_class.java:7: cannot find symbol
symbol  : class Test_class
location: class Testpackage.Derived_class
          Test_class I = new Test_class(1,2); 
                             ^
Derived_class.java:15: cannot find symbol
symbol  : method product()
location: class Testpackage.Derived_class
             vol = this.product();
share|improve this question
    
Is TestPackage ur own package or it's the package provided by some APIs to allow u testing ur code? –  palAlaa Feb 6 '11 at 3:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When using packages, you should call your compiler from the directory at the root of the package hierarchy (in your case ~).

So, go one directory up, and call javac this way:

javac TestPackage/Derived_class.java

Then the compiling should work. For executing, you then would use:

 java TestPackage.Derived_class

(but your class does not have any main method yet.)


Edit: Why is this necessary? When javac searches classes referenced from your classes, it searches them according to their package. Your Derived_class referenced the class TestPackage.TestClass, and this would be searched in TestPackage/TestClass.java (or .class) (relative to the classpath, which here consists of your working directory). No such directory exists, when you are already inside of the TestPackage directory.

Another way to call it here would be to use

javac -cp .. Derived_class.java

since then javac would search the related classes from the parent directory. You should then also set the '-d' parameter to put generated class files in the right structure. Call javac -help for a summary of the options, or look in your JDK documentation for a more detailed description of all the options.

When you compile only a single file, it does not really matter, since the file to compile is given on the command line, and javac does not need to search more files.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh that WORKED!!. thanks, but I am not sure why I have to go one level up to compile any good reason for that?. the Test_class compiled fine maybe because it was stand alone. –  dasman Feb 6 '11 at 4:12
    
see my latest edit. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 6 '11 at 4:28

With packages you need to import from the right package. Previously you have been defining in and importing from the “default” (undeclared/unnamed) package, but now you are defining your classes in a TestPackage and so you will need to import from TestPackage.

E.g.: import TestPackage.Test_class;

share|improve this answer
    
I added that line and it said Testpackage does not exist. Just to reiterate, both source files are in the Testpackage dir in my home folder. Test_class compiles without any problem. –  dasman Feb 6 '11 at 4:00
    
Classes in the same package do not need to be imported (or are imported automatically). –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 6 '11 at 4:00

Classes defined in the same package do not need to be imported. I would suspect you do not have the sources files in a directory tree matching the package your are building... but I see you do. Also check to make sure your classpath is setup right.

Look half-way down this page for more: http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/tooldocs/windows/javac.html

And build the base class first.

share|improve this answer

Once you put the classes in a package, you have to make sure your classpath is set correctly to find the classes in the right place.

For example, if you use no classpath, then your classpath is taken as "." (i.e. the current working dir is the only dir in the classpath). So when you compile your classes without package declarations in them, it puts the class files in the current directory and then when it looks for them, it successfully finds them in your classpath.

Then, if you add package declarations and compile them, the compiler will look for the packages in "./Testpackage" and not find them (because the compiler is still putting the class files in the current directory).

The simple solution is when you add the package declarations into your class, also moved them into a directory that reflects that package, i.e.. "./Testpackage". Then invoke the compiler with the "Testpackage/*.java". When you want the classes to be in the default package, remove the package declarations and move the class back to ".".

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah I guess its the same as Paulo. Thanks –  dasman Feb 6 '11 at 4:15
    
@ user568173 - Yes, but what you should take away from all of this is that putting classes in packages is more than just adding package xyz - you should also put the file in a directory that reflects the package. You can also avoid having to moving around if you set an explicit classpath that points to the root of your source tree. –  Bert F Feb 6 '11 at 4:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.