Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a large file I/O library and am currently struggling with the interoperability of getline() and writing to a file. My question below is alot like this one, which unfortunately remains unanswered: C++ After I use getline to read from a file I can no longer write to the txt file

Once I've used getline(), I'm no longer able to write to the file. Read requests with getline() will continue to operate, but write requests will fail. However, if I comment out the usage of getline(), the write operations will succeed.

My code is posted below. I've noticed that the failbit is being activated following the first write attempt. However, the reason for this occurring is unknown to me, as it is not active if I remove the getline() operations.

I should be clear -- I can read from the existing file (which contains TWO lines) perfectly. However, I am unable to write to that file, unless I remove the getline() statements.

Any help, is as always, appriciated.

// Includes
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

// Namespace
using namespace std;

int main(){
    // filestream object
    fstream workFile("testdoc.txt"); //fstream uses ios::in | ios::out by default
    // note that I have tried including ios::in | ios::out to no avail

    // read from file
    string grabbedLine;
    getline(workFile, grabbedLine);
    cout << "Line #1: " << grabbedLine << endl;

    // write to file
    workFile<< "Here is some output (#1)" << endl;

    // read from file
    getline(workFile, grabbedLine);
    cout << "Line #2: " << grabbedLine << endl;

    // write to file
    workFile<< "Here is some output (#2)" << endl;

    // wait for some input...
    getchar();
}

Current console output (as expected from text file):
Line #1: This is line#1
Line #2: This is line#2
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on some experimentation, it looks like the << operator expects the offset to be at the end of the file. I can't explain it exactly, but it seems that the offset isn't where it expects it to be after you call getline(). I was able to get writing to the file to work by adding the line:

workFile.seekg(ios_base::end);

immediately before writing to the file. This however, will put the offset at the end of the file and not correctly read the second line afterward.

What I think you want to do is open two file handles, one that you will read from and one that you will write to:

int main(){
    // filestream object
    fstream workFileRead("testdoc.txt", ios_base::in);
    fstream workFileWrite("testdoc.txt" , ios_base::app | ios_base::out);

    // read from file
    string grabbedLine;
    getline(workFileRead, grabbedLine);
    cout << "Line #1: " << grabbedLine << endl;

    // write to file
    workFileWrite << "Here is some output (#1)" << endl;

    // read from file
    getline(workFileRead, grabbedLine);
    cout << "Line #2: " << grabbedLine << endl;

    // write to file
    workFileWrite<< "Here is some output (#2)" << endl;

    // wait for some input...
    getchar();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to test my problem. –  BSchlinker Feb 26 '11 at 5:52

I know this is an old post now, but I just came across the same problem and kept hitting this unanswered post in Google searching. ...

I managed to get this working. As explained in the linked post, reading to the end of file with getline() sets the Fail bit. This needs to be cleared, and the pointer set to the right place for writing before the write will be successful... e.g. my code to read the last line of a file and then write something:

fstream myfile;
char line[10];
string myText;

myfile.open("test.txt", ios::in | ios::out);
while ( myfile.getline(line,10) )
{  myText = line; }  //myText is left storing the last line

myfile.clear();
myfile.seekp(0, ios::end);
myfile << "Writing to this file!!!" << endl;
myfile.close();
share|improve this answer

An fstream only has one stream position, shared by reads and writes. So you actually DO have to do a seek when changing between reading and writing. You can use one of the tell functions to save your current read or write position, and then seek back when you want to continue.

Opening the file twice to get two stream positions is likely NOT a good idea. If the OS allows you to do that at all, you are likely to get the file contents mixed up in all kinds of ways.

share|improve this answer

The file is most likely not opened for output, so instead of

fstream workFile("testdoc.txt");

use following

fstream workFile("testdoc.txt", fstream::in | fstream::out);
share|improve this answer
    
fstream by default opens with those two characteristics (cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files). However, I have tried this and unfortunately it does not solve the problem. –  BSchlinker Feb 6 '11 at 4:34

Think about what << does to the file: it writes to it, and since you can read from it, we know it was opened to append. )Otherwise, the file would be truncated first, and reads wouldn't succeed.) When you write the data to the file, the file offset is automatically at the end of the file, so now there's nothing more to read.

Now, you could write your way around this by using lseek(2) or the methods that wrap it, like fstream::tellg,but I bet what you really want is to create a temp file for output, write everything to that file, and then move the temp file back to replace the original.

Update

Sorry, it's late and I reversed the sense of the question. If nothing's happening at all, then likely you haven't got a file that's open to write. Have you checked the fail flag? See the docs for the iostream::fstream class, where it says:

Constructs an object of the fstream class. This implies the initialization of the associated filebuf object and the call to the constructor of its base class with the filebuf object as parameter.

Additionally, when the second constructor version is used, the stream is associated with a physical file as if a call to the member function open with the same parameters was made.

If the constructor is not successful in opening the file, the object is still created although no file is associated to the stream buffer and the stream's failbit is set (which can be checked with inherited member fail).

share|improve this answer
    
This would be true if the file was actually being written to. However, it is not. As you can see above, the second line is successfully read, showing that the file offset is not moved. When I check the file contents after, the file contents have not been changed. –  BSchlinker Feb 6 '11 at 4:28
    
For instance, if the file only had one line, I should be able to "getline()" and then perform an output operation on the next line. However, that is not currently possible -- the file will not be written to. –  BSchlinker Feb 6 '11 at 4:32
    
Ah, sorry. Reverse the sense of the point with how the file is opened: I suspect you're not opening the file for write at all. –  Charlie Martin Feb 6 '11 at 4:41
    
I an confirm that I have a file open to write, because the write operation succeeds when it is not preceded by a getline() operation. However, you are correct - the fail flag is set when a write attempts to occur following a getline() operation. The reason behind this failure is the basis for my question. –  BSchlinker Feb 6 '11 at 5:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.