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I want to be able use python descriptors in a class which has the slots optimization:

class C(object):    
    __slots__ = ['a']
    a = MyDescriptor('a')
    def __init__(self, val):
        self.a = val

The problem I have is how to implement the descriptor class in order to be able to store values in the class instance which invokes the descriptor object. The usual solution would look like the one below but will not work since "dict" is no longer defined when "slots" is invoked in the C class:

class MyDescriptor(object):
    __slots__ = ['name']    
    def __init__(self, name_):
        self.name = name_
    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        if self.name not in instance.__dict__:
            raise AttributeError, self.name
        return instance.__dict__[self.name]     
    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        instance.__dict__[self.name] = value
share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Don't declare the same name as a slot and as an instance method. Use different names, and access the slot as an attribute, not via __dict__.

class MyDescriptor(object):
    __slots__ = ['name']
    def __init__(self, name_):
        self.name = name_
    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        return getattr(instance, self.name)
    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        setattr(instance, self.name, value)

class C(object):
    __slots__ = ['_a']
    a = MyDescriptor('_a')
    def __init__(self, val):
        self.a = val

foo = C(1)
print foo.a
foo.a = 2
print foo.a
share|improve this answer
    
After executing that, I can see that C.__dict__ is created. Isn't that something we are trying to avoid? Anyway, looking at the documentation __slots__ is already using descriptor interface for its own purpose, so this could be really difficult. – dhill Jan 23 '13 at 12:11

Though of dubious value, the following trick will work, if it is ok to put the first __slots__ in a subclass.

class A( object ):
    __slots__ = ( 'a', )

class B( A ):
    __slots__ = ()

    @property
    def a( self ):
        try:
            return A.a.__get__( self )
        except AttributeError:
            return 'no a set'

    @a.setter
    def a( self, val ):
        A.a.__set__( self, val )

(You can use your own descriptor rather than property.) With these definitions:

>>> b = B()
>>> b.a
'no a set'
>>> b.a = 'foo'
>>> b.a
'foo'

As far as I understand, __slots__ is implemented with its own descriptor, so another descriptor after __slots__ in the same class would just overwrite. If you want to elaborate this technique, you could search for a candidate descriptor in self.__class__.__mro__ (or starting with instance in your own __get__).

Postscript

Ok ... well if you really want to use one class, you can use the following adaptation:

class C( object ):
    __slots__ = ( 'c', )

class MyDescriptor( object ):

    def __init__( self, slots_descriptor ):
        self.slots_descriptor = slots_descriptor

    def __get__( self, inst, owner = None ):
        try:
            return self.slots_descriptor.__get__( inst, owner )
        except AttributeError:
            return 'no c'

    def __set__( self, inst, val ):
        self.slots_descriptor.__set__( inst, val )

C.c = MyDescriptor( C.c )

If you insist on inscrutability, you can make the assignment in a metaclass or a class decorator.

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