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I'm looking for a regex to remove trailing zeros from decimal numbers. It should return the following results:

0.0002300 -> 0.00023
10.002300 -> 10.0023
100.0     -> 100
1000      -> 1000
0.0       -> 0
0         -> 0

Basically, it should remove trailing zeros and trailing decimal point if the fraction part is 0. It should also return 0 when that's the value. Any thoughts? thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try the regex:

(?:(\..*[^0])0+|\.0+)$

and replace it with:

\1

A demo:

tests = ['0.0002300', '10.002300', '100.0', '1000', '0.0', '0']
tests.each { |tst|
  print tst, " -> ", tst.sub(/(?:(\..*[^0])0+|\.0+)$/, '\1'), "\n"
}

which produces:

0.0002300 -> 0.00023
10.002300 -> 10.0023
100.0 -> 100
1000 -> 1000
0.0 -> 0
0 -> 0

Or you could simply do "%g" % tst to drop the trailing zeros:

tests = ['0.0002300', '10.002300', '100.0', '1000', '0.0', '0']
tests.each { |tst|
  s = "%g" % tst
  print tst, " -> ", s, "\n"
}

which produces the same output.

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1  
I think it's a lot more complicated than it needs to be but it works so +1. –  Mark Byers Feb 6 '11 at 11:49
    
:), I fully agree @Mark. I glared at it a little, but can't see a short-cut though... –  Bart Kiers Feb 6 '11 at 11:50
    
Yep, I can't suggest a simpler solution right now.... I give up. :) –  Mark Byers Feb 6 '11 at 11:54
    
thanks, this is great! –  sa125 Feb 6 '11 at 12:31
    
@sa125, you're welcome. –  Bart Kiers Feb 6 '11 at 12:34

just another way

["100.0","0.00223000"].map{|x|"%g"%x}
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Thanks, this is great! Your solution "%g"%x is only 6 characters! –  antinome May 25 '12 at 16:22

Hey guys it is so much easier than you are doing, just add .to_int after the variable and it will remove the trailing zero.

tests = ['0.0002300', '10.002300', '100.0', '1000', '0.0', '0']
tests.each { |tst|
  print tst.to_int
}
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There's no to_int in ruby that I know of (perhaps you meant to_i). Assuming you used to_i, it just rounds off the entire number to the nearest interger, so 0.0002300 -> 0, whereas I wanted to get 0.0002300 -> 0.00023. –  sa125 Aug 11 '11 at 4:02
    
That would truncate the number, which is definitely not the desired behavior. –  Sean Cameron Nov 12 '12 at 13:22

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