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How would you refactor something like this:

$start = $_GET['s'];
if (!is_int($start) || $start < 0)
{
    $start = 0;
}

Here I need start to equal 0 or greater, however later on I will need it to equal 1 or greater. How would this be made into a function?

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Why would you want to make this into a function? I can't really see anything in dire need of refactoring here to be honest –  Pekka 웃 Feb 6 '11 at 14:05
    
Sorry I had two windows open so I mistyped the title. –  user565031 Feb 6 '11 at 15:25
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code will not work. $_GET will return a string. is_int will always fail. You should use is_numeric or typecast to int.

function minimal($value, $min)
{
    $value = (int)$value;
    if ($value < $min)
    {
        return $min;
    }
    return $value;
}
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There is a builtin for that:

print max($_GET["s"], 0);

It still requires the (int) typcast though, and I would apply it to the $_GET access directly.

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function positiveInt($value, $maxValue = 0) {
    $value = (int) $value;
    return ( $value < $maxValue ) ? $maxValue : $value;
}

$start = positiveInt($_GET['s']);

$start = positiveInt($_GET['s'], 5);
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function myFunction($getparam, $equals){
  if(!is_int($getparam) || $getparam < $equals)
    return $equals
  return 'your actual return value';     
}

Is that what you intend to do :)?

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Using the ternary operator can be helpful. Not everyone finds ternary operations to be easily readable. A matter of preference, I suppose.

function unsignedInt($int) {
    return (int) $int >= 0 ? (int) $int : 0;
}

$start = unsignedInt($_GET['s']);

Although this could still potentially show warnings (the function doesn't ensure $_GET['s'] exists), so I would personally probably declare my expected get vars at the top of the script:

$_GET['s'] = isset($_GET['s']) ? $_GET['s'] : '';

And since the function is incredibly similar, I might do it all in that variable declaration instead of going with the function:

$start = isset($_GET['s']) && (int) $_GET['s'] >= 0 ? (int) $_GET['s'] : 0;

So I suppose it depends on how you plan to use this method in your code.

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