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I'm trying to POST a serialized object to my WCF service. However, I keep receiving a "NotFound" error. I have been beating my head on this for three days. Can someone tell me what I'm doing wrong? Below is my client-side code, my WCF service operation, and the class definition I'm trying to serialize.

Client-Side Code

// Build a wrapper exception that will be serialized
Exception ex = e.ExceptionObject;
MyException exception = new MyException(ex.Message, ex.StackTrace, "silverlight app", ex.GetType().FullName, string.Empty);

string json = string.Empty;
using (MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
  // Serialize the object 
  DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(objectType);
  serializer.WriteObject(memoryStream, objectToSerialize);

  // Convert the data to json
  byte[] bytes = memoryStream.ToArray();
  int count = (int)(memoryStream.Length);
  json = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(bytes, 0, count);
}

 // Submit the information to log
string url = "http://localhost:90/services/MyService.svc/LogError";
WebClient loggingService = new WebClient();
loggingService.UploadStringCompleted += new UploadStringCompletedEventHandler(loggingService_UploadStringCompleted);
loggingService.Headers["Content-type"] = "application/json";
loggingService.Encoding = Encoding.UTF8;
loggingService.UploadStringAsync(new Uri(logExceptionUrl), "POST", json);

MyException (Client-Side Version)

public class MyException : Exception
{
  private readonly string stackTrace;
  public override string StackTrace
  {
    get {
      return base.StackTrace;
    }
  }

  private readonly string message;
  public override string Message
  {
    get {
      return base.Message;
    }
  }

  private readonly string component;
  public string Component
  {
    get { return component; }
  }

  private readonly string typeName;
  public string TypeName
  {
    get { return typeName; }
  }

  private readonly string miscellaneous;
  public string Miscellaneous
  {
    get { return miscellaneous; }
  }

  public MyException()
  { }

  public MyException(string message) : base(message)
  { }

  public MyException(string message, Exception inner) : base(message, inner)
  { }

  public MyException(string message, string stackTrace) : base()
  {
    this.message = message;
    this.stackTrace = stackTrace;
  }

  public MyException(string message, string stackTrace, string component, string typeName, string miscellaneous) : base()
  {
    this.message = message;
    this.stackTrace = stackTrace;
    this.component = component;
    this.typeName = typeName;
    this.miscellaneous = miscellaneous;
  }
}

WCF Service

[OperationContract]
[WebInvoke(UriTemplate = "/LogError", BodyStyle=WebMessageBodyStyle.Bare, RequestFormat=WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
public string LogError(MyException exc)
{
  try
  { 
    // Write the details of exc to the database 
    return "ok";
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    return "error";
  }
}

MyException in the WCF Project

[Serializable]
public class MyException : Exception
{
  public override string StackTrace
  {
    get { return base.StackTrace; }
  }
  private readonly string stackTrace;

  public override string Message
  {
    get { return base.Message; }
  }
  private readonly string message;

  public string Component
  {
    get { return component; }
    set { /* */ }
  }
  private readonly string component;

  public string TypeName
  {
    get { return typeName; }
    set { /* */ }
  }
  private readonly string typeName;

  public string Miscellaneous
  {
    get { return miscellaneous; }
    set { /* */ }
  }
  private readonly string miscellaneous;

  public MyException() 
  {}

  public MyException(string message) : base(message)
  { }

  public MyException(string message, Exception inner) : base(message, inner)
  { }

  public MyException(string message, string stackTrace) : base()
  {
    this.message = message;
    this.stackTrace = stackTrace;
  }

  public MyException(string message, string stackTrace, string component, string typeName, string miscellaneous) : base()
  {
    this.message = message;
    this.stackTrace = stackTrace;
    this.component = component;
    this.typeName = typeName;
    this.miscellaneous = miscellaneous;
  }   

  protected MyException(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context) : base(info, context)
  {
    component = info.GetString("component");
    typeName = info.GetString("typeName");
    miscellaneous = info.GetString("miscellaneous");
  }

  public override void GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
  {
    base.GetObjectData(info, context);
    info.AddValue("component", component);
    info.AddValue("typeName", typeName);
    info.AddValue("miscellaneous", miscellaneous);
  }
}

Thank you for your help!

share|improve this question
    
when you say "not found", can you detail the exact HTTP Error. Is it a 404, or a 400 (Bad Request)? – Taylor Bird Feb 6 '11 at 14:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In order to invoke a web service in .NET you usually generate a client proxy. You could use the svcutil.exe utility or Add Service Reference... dialog in Visual Studio. Once you have the strongly typed client proxy you simply invoke the service without using any WebClients, MemoryStreams, DataContractJsonSerializers, ...

using (var client = new MyWebServiceClient())
{
    var result = client.SomeMethod();
}

The WCF infrastructure takes care of the rest.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Darin, I understand that approach. However, I want to call this method from an Android Application later as well. Because of this, I'm trying to understand how to serialize an object properly on the client-side now. – user208662 Feb 6 '11 at 14:16
    
@user208662, why not simplify your life at least when you have .NET clients? When you have to write an Android client you won't have the same classes as in .NET to call it so the code you write here won't be reusable. The approach will be completely different. So here's what I would suggest you. Do it properly in .NET and use a network analyzer tool such as Wireshark to see exactly what's been exchanged over the wire if you want to see the exact data. – Darin Dimitrov Feb 6 '11 at 14:20
    
+1 unless you (@user208662) have a need to invoke this outside of .NET. The service appears to be RESTful, in which case you can invoke w/o a strongly-typed proxy, but unless you have a need, just build a proxy class. If you have the need to invoke using just webClient, you'll need to mark up your MyException class with DataContract attributes, and really groom your serilization to ensure the Json over the wire exactly matches what the endpoint expects. (This is what the proxy is going to help you with otherwise) – Taylor Bird Feb 6 '11 at 14:21
    
Agreed 100% to Darin's last comment. @user208662, to properly serialize you're going to need to massage the data to exactly match the DataContract your service layer expects. The easiest way to do this is to get some help (.net proxy), make it work, then use the serialization classes to get you from where you are (your above example) to where you want to be (the over-the-wire version of what the .net proxy gives you) – Taylor Bird Feb 6 '11 at 14:22
    
Maybe I'm making an inappropriate assumption then. I want to write a service operation that a iphone, wp7, or android app can post to. Are you saying that I need to write a seperate operation for each client? Or is there a way to structure my operation such that it can be called from each client? – user208662 Feb 6 '11 at 14:23

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