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I have an query like this , but it does not work , what's wrong with IN keyword with CASE EXPRESSION ?

Select State = case c.addressId
  when in('2552','2478','2526') then 'IN' 
  when in ('9999') then 'OUT'
  else 'UNKNOWN'
  end,
  name, time
from x;

I've use SQL Server 2008 and this is the error msg :

Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'in'.

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1  
Oh, how great it could have been to have a comma separated list of WHEN expressions in simple CASE! And it doesn't even seem too hard a change to the syntax. –  Andriy M Feb 6 '11 at 19:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You've got the syntax wrong. It should be CASE WHEN [COLUMN] in (...):

Select 
  case when c.addressId in('2552','2478','2526') then 'IN' 
  when c.addressId in ('9999') then 'OUT'
  else 'UNKNOWN'
  end as State,
  name, time
from contact c;
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3  
Being pedantic -- CASE supports the column reference between the CASE and the WHEN, just not for IN and other forms of comparison/evaluation logic. –  OMG Ponies Feb 6 '11 at 16:28

Consider using a join instead.

SELECT ISNULL(a.[State], 'UNKNOWN') [State]
    , c.[Name]
    , c.[Time]
FROM [contact] c
LEFT OUTER JOIN
(
    SELECT 2552 AddressId, 'IN' [State]
    UNION ALL SELECT 2478, 'IN'
    UNION ALL SELECT 2526, 'IN'
    UNION ALL SELECT 9999, 'OUT'
) [address] a ON a.AddressId = c.AddressId;
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I can't think of a single reason why that would be better then the case/when construct. Unless you meant to pull the values from a table? –  Ronnis Feb 6 '11 at 18:51
    
A table is a great idea. Then you can add or remove magic numbers without changing your SQL code. You can also add a descriptive field which explains each magic number. –  Anthony Faull Feb 6 '11 at 20:20

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