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I have been reading this question and doesn't get the problem it encounters. why does initializing subclasses require calling the super class's same init function?

From what I've read and understood. Every class will have its own designed initializer. In this case, if a class has several initializer. Let's say I have a "Shape.h" class like this.

- (id) init
{
    return [self initWithHeight: 0];
}

- (id) initWithHeight: (int) h
{
    return [self initWithHeight:h withWidth:0];
}

- (id) initWithHeight: (int) h withWidth: (int) w
{
    if(self = [super init]); //since the superclass is NSObject, I use init as designated initializer
    {
        [self setHeight:h];
        [self setWidth:w];
    }
return self
}

And I subclasses a new class named "Rectangle.h" from the "Shape.h" class. Since I have the "Shape.h" designated class as "-(id) initWithHeight: (int) h andWitdh: (int) w", that means I will need to use it for [super init] in the "Rectangle.h" class right? It become like this.

- (id) initWithHeight: (int) h withWidth: (int) w
{
    return [self initWithHeight: h withWidth: w withColor:nil];
}

- (id) initWithHeight: (int) h withWidth: (int) w withColor: (NSString *) c
{
    if(self = [super initWithHeight:h andWidth:w])
    {
        [self setHeight:h];
        [self setWidth:w];
        [self setColor:c];
    }
return self;
}

In "Rectangle.h" I overwrite the super (which is Shape.h) designated init and customize it to fit with "Rectangle.h" designated class. Is this way of working correct and doesn't cause looping? If it is so, can anyone explain to me in the link posted why it will loop if I use the [super init] without following the superclass designated init.

I'm sorry if I cause any confusion. I can't really grasp the concept well.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code seems to be correct, have you tried it? The designated initializer is the "most complete" initializer, which is the one that should be used by all others initializers. And this is done by both Rectangle and Shape classes. So what you do in the Rectangle init is to initialize your class using the super (Shape) initializer. Then you check if self is correct (it may happen that super returned nil for any reason, e.g. your w/h parameters are incorrect; however this is not the case for Shape). Then you assign the right color. What you shouldn't do is to reassign Height and Width as this is already done by the Shape initializer. It makes sense to do this only if your new class needs to override the settings of its super (whatever is the reason). So your code is correct, but remove the two sets:



        [self setHeight:h];
        [self setWidth:w];
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So if I use the designated init in "Rectangle.h" class, it will call the super init and set the value of height and width using the super class designated init. Passing the value to the current class (subclass) and I assign the value of color to the subclass "Rectangle.h". So my approach to only overwrite the super class designated init is correct in my code right? If this is correct, can I replace the "Rectangle.h" self=[super initWithHeight: (int) h andWitdth: w] into self=[super init] since the super class will eventually call it designated init. –  sayzlim Feb 6 '11 at 17:59
    
No, it's not correct. Infact if Rectangle initWithHeight:Width:Color calls [super init], then in turn Rectangle initWithHeight:Width will be called which calls Rectangle initWithHeight:Width:Color thus leading to a circularity. Besides you wouldn't take advantage of the full initialization performed by Shape's initWithHeight:andWidth. So be very careful and always follows this rule (from Apple's "The Objective-C programming language":): General Principle: The designated initializer in a class must, through a message to super, invoke the designated initializer in a superclass. –  viggio24 Feb 6 '11 at 21:29
    
What is the difference between these two lines? [super init] and [super initWithHeight:AndWidth:]. Why is the later doesn't cause circularity? I mean, if I use [super init], isn't it that the Shape.h initWithHeight->initWithHeight:andWidth will be called which make them same? –  sayzlim Feb 6 '11 at 23:13
    
the problem is that if you call [super init] you will call Shape's init, right? but Shape's init will call [self initWithHeight:0] but "self" is Rectangle. So it will call Rectangle's initWithHeight: which doesn't exists, so Shape's initWithHeight: will be called. But Shape's initWithHeight: calls [self initWithHeight:h withWidth:0] but self is Rectangle so it will call Rectangle's initWithHeight:withWidth: which calls [self initWithHeigth:withWidth:withColor:] which is the caller ==> circularity. –  viggio24 Feb 7 '11 at 10:28
    
Thank you, I finally understand why it cause circularity. Self is always point to the current class no matter if I invoke the methods from super class (Since the super class invoke self which called the current class Rectangle). –  sayzlim Feb 14 '11 at 6:12

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