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Suppose:

x <-  c(10,10,10,5,5,20,20)
rank(x) 

Gives us:

[1] 4.0 4.0 4.0 1.5 1.5 6.5 6.5

Is there a way to create a ranking that does not increment when two numbers are found to be ties? In this case:

[1] 2 2 2 1 1 3 3

I've played with all the options for ties.method option (average, max, min, random) none of which are designed to provide the desired result.

Is it possible to acheive this with the rank() function?

share|improve this question
    
You tried to use "for loops"? –  Filip Krstic Feb 6 '11 at 20:29
    
No, not yet. I was hoping that there was something I might be missing (or not understanding) from the base package that has this functionality. –  Brandon Bertelsen Feb 6 '11 at 20:33
1  
Hold on there -- no need for loops! Whenever you find yourself using a for loop, try harder to find a better way! See my answer below. –  Prasad Chalasani Feb 6 '11 at 21:02
    
upvoted, great question. The example is very specific though (already sorted numbers without "holes"), this question would be much more useful with more general example. I will try to generalize it to match the answers, which are already generalized. –  TMS Nov 30 at 11:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can think of a quick function to do this. It's not optimal with a for loop but it works:)

x=c(1,1,2,3,4,5,8,8)

foo <- function(x){
    su=sort(unique(x))
    for (i in 1:length(su)) x[x==su[i]] = i
    return(x)
}

foo(x)

[1] 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 6
share|improve this answer
    
This works wonderfully. Thank you. Also of note, it's very simple to change the direction of the sort if you need a decreasing rank! Cheers! –  Brandon Bertelsen Feb 6 '11 at 20:52

Modified crayola solution but uing match instead of merge:

x_unique <- unique(x)
x_ranks <- rank(x_unique)
x_ranks[match(x,x_unique)]
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! As it turns out it seems (benchmarking with rep(x, 100000)) that this is the fastest solution. Basically: Marek > Prasad (revised) > Chase > Prasad (first) > Crayola (in terms of speed) –  crayola Feb 6 '11 at 21:39
6  
You could do this all in one line: match(x, sort(unique(x))) –  hadley Feb 7 '11 at 0:23
1  
@hadley As always you are right ;) I figure out this solution after posting, but timings were surprising so I hold with update. –  Marek Feb 7 '11 at 11:09

The "loopless" way to do it is to simply treat the vector as an ordered factor, then convert it to numeric:

> as.numeric( ordered( c( 10,10,10,10, 5,5,5, 10, 10 ) ) )
[1] 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2
> as.numeric( ordered( c(0.5,0.56,0.76,0.23,0.33,0.4) ))
[1] 4 5 6 1 2 3
> as.numeric( ordered( c(1,1,2,3,4,5,8,8) ))
[1] 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 6

Update: Another way, that seems faster is to use findInterval and sort(unique()):

> x <- c( 10, 10, 10, 10, 5,5,5, 10, 10)
> findInterval( x, sort(unique(x)))
[1] 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2

> x <- round( abs( rnorm(1000000)*10))
> system.time( z <- as.numeric( ordered( x )))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.996   0.025   1.021 
> system.time( z <- findInterval( x, sort(unique(x))))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.077   0.003   0.080 
share|improve this answer

Another function that does this, but it seems inefficient. There is no for loop, but I doubt it is more efficient than Sacha's suggestion!

x=c(1,1,2,3,4,5,8,8)
fancy.rank <- function(x) {
    x.unique <- unique(x)
    d1 <- data.frame(x=x)
    d2 <- data.frame(x=x.unique, rank(x.unique))
    merge(d1, d2, by="x")[,2]
}

fancy.rank(x)

[1] 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 6
share|improve this answer

What about sort()?

x <- c(1,1,2,3,4,5)
sort(x)

> sort(x) 
[1] 1 1 2 3 4 5
share|improve this answer
    
This is correct by coincidence. The numbers aren't as clean as in the example. ie. try: x <- c(0.5,0.56,0.76,0.23,0.33,0.4) –  Brandon Bertelsen Feb 6 '11 at 20:52
    
@Brandon - Maybe I'm not comprehending some restriction of your need here...probably this part "I can't have two elements at either end of the range being greater than 1 or max(range)." What is the desired output from your example in the comment above? If that is more representative than what is in your question, maybe you could edit the question to reflect that? –  Chase Feb 6 '11 at 21:01
    
apologies if it wasn't clear. The question is about ranking data and what you've done here provides a sort of the data that just happens to also be the same sequence of numbers that would come from the solution of ranking them that I'm trying to get at. The goal is to get the ranks, not just the sorting. –  Brandon Bertelsen Feb 6 '11 at 21:20
    
Also, w.r.t. the comment about greater than 1 or max(range). If you look in my question, the example I've provided for rank(x) returns 1.5,1.5... basically, I wanted them to be 1,1,... (not greater than 1) –  Brandon Bertelsen Feb 6 '11 at 21:29

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