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I was wondering how to do something in C++. I want to be able to create an instance of this struct

struct ComplexInstruction : simple_instr
{
    bool isHead;
    bool isTail;
};

that copies all the data from the simple_instr instance. So essentially, I want to do something like this

ComplexInstruction cInstr = instr; // <- instance of simple_instr

and have cInstr have a copy of all the data in instr without having to copy over every field (since there's alot of them). I'm not sure how do this, and I don't think simple casting will work. Additionally, is it possible to do the reverse? I.e. have an instance of ComplexInstruction and turn it into an instance of simple_instr. I assume this can be done using casting, but I don;t have alot of experience with c++

Thanks in advance

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create a consctructor in the derived class to initialize from a base class.

class Base
{
  int x;
public:
  Base(int a) : x(a){}
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
  Derived(const Base & B) : Base(B){}
};

Note that if you have a derived object of Base, you actually have a base object and you can safely use the base copy ctor like so.

Derived d;
Base b(d);//the parts of Base that are in Derived are now copied from d to b.
          //Rest is ignored.  

If you want to be more verbose, you write an operator= in your derived class like

void operator=(const Base & b)
{
  Base::operator=(b);
  //don't forget to initialize the rest of the derived members after this, though.
}

It all depends on what you want to do, really. The important thing is: be explicit. Don't leave uninitialized members of your class.

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This assumes that the default copy ctor provided by base is good enough. If it isn't, you need to define another. –  San Jacinto Feb 6 '11 at 20:55
1  
+1 Still, this is by far the best solution (in fact the only one that is correct). The potential issue with the default copy constructor of the base not being sufficient is a problem in itself and unrelated to this particular question. (A slight improvement would be using the initialization list instead of assignment in the body of the Base copy constructor) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 6 '11 at 21:09
    
The solution is fine, but often you want one-parameter non-copy constructors to be explicit. –  Philipp Feb 6 '11 at 21:13
    
I should mention that in my edit, the word "explicit" does not mean the same as what Philipp uses. –  San Jacinto Feb 6 '11 at 21:25
    
@Philipp: Often true, but the OP specifically asked for an implicit conversion. –  Fred Nurk Feb 6 '11 at 22:06
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You need to provide a constructor that takes an argument that is convertible to const simple_instr&:

struct simple_instr {
  int i;
  simple_instr(): i(0) { }
  explicit simple_instr(int i): i(i) { }
};

struct ComplexInstruction: simple_instr {
  explicit ComplexInstruction(const simple_instr& simple):
    simple_instr(simple), isHead(false), isTail(false) { }
  bool isHead;
  bool isTail;
};

int main() {
  simple_instr instr;
  ComplexInstruction cInstr(instr);
}

Here I chose an explicit constructor, but depending on the semantics, an implicit one could also be appropriate. Only if the constructor is implicit, the =-style initialization works without casting.

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Edit: This is not the best way to accomplish this, please look at the other answers.


This will do what you are looking for.

struct ComplexInstruction : simple_instr
{
    ComplexInstruction(const simple_instr &simple)
    {
       *((simple_instr*)this) = simple;
    }

    bool isHead;
    bool isTail;
};

Then ComplexInstruciton complex = simple; will call the conversion constructor. ComplexInstruction's copy construct casts this to its base class and the = will call simple_instr's copy constructor, which by default is a bitwise copy.

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That's funny because I just tried that coincidentally, gave me a stack overflow exception :) –  Marlon Feb 6 '11 at 20:51
    
Doh! Of course it would we're *this = simple calls the copy constructor. –  shf301 Feb 6 '11 at 20:55
    
Ok, edited with a cast to the base type in the constructor and tested it in VS2010 –  shf301 Feb 6 '11 at 20:59
    
It does end up in infinite recursion => stack overflow. The issue is that when the compiler sees the line: *this = simple; it tries to match it with operator= at the current level, and that takes a ComplexInstruction as argument luckily (??) for the compiler it finds that it can instantiate a ComplexInstruction from a simple_instr by calling the constructor that we are defining... A simple solution is changing the line into: simple_instr::operator=( simple );. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 6 '11 at 21:02
6  
much simpler to just have ComplexInstruction(const simple_instr& simple) : simple_instr(simple) {} –  diverscuba23 Feb 6 '11 at 21:28
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