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I am writing a bash script that modifies a file that looks like this:

--- usr1 ---
data data data data
data data data data
data data data data
--- usr2 ---
data data data data
data data data data
--- usr3 ---
data data data data
--- endline ---

One question is: How to add next user line --- usrn --- after last user data lines? Second one is: How to delete specific user data lines (data lines and --- userx ---) i.e. I would like to delete usr2 with all his data set.

It must work on bash 2.05 :) and I think it will use awk or sed, but I'm not sure.
A little edit here: In fact usernames are not numbered. We don't know what users will come up with. We only know that the name will be inside --- pattern

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Can you show what you have in your script so far? Is the data for the new user contained in shell variables? Is the next user number known or does it need to be calculated as one higher than the last? What do you want to do with skipped numbers - renumber, etc? Do you need to insert user data between existing users or always after the last and before the endline? –  Dennis Williamson Feb 6 '11 at 21:21
    
The script is quite long so i will rather not post it here. But: Data will be put after the user name later so there is no data other then user name (in the shell variables); names don't contain number, it was just an example (they are like kasper, vader, profesor4, etc... what user will come up with); becouse of that we don't know the next user name, we only knows that the data set is closed before next ---; no renumbering; data will be inserted under the user name that is logged on. –  kasper Feb 6 '11 at 21:31
    
Looks like a case for sed multiline matching. So start matching when we hit --usr1-- (or whatever user we want to delete data from) and add lines to the hold space until we match --- and then delete the hold space. –  Henno Brandsma Feb 6 '11 at 21:43
    
@Henno: yeah, that sounds like what i need, but my sed skills are totally at noob level, so please cover your thoughts with commands :) –  kasper Feb 6 '11 at 22:47
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given a username in a variable:

username="kasper"

Delete a user section:

sed "/$username/{:a;N;/\n--- [^[:blank:]]* ---\$/{s/.*\n//;b};ba}" inputfile

or for some versions of sed (edited):

sed -e "/$username/{" -e ':a' -e 'N' -e '/\n--- [^[:blank:]]* ---$/{s/.*\n//' -e 'b' -e '}' -e 'ba' -e '}' inputfile

Edit: a possible variation to accommodate leading and trailing whitespace:

sed -e "/$username/{" -e ':a' -e 'N' -e '/\n[[:blank:]]*---[[:blank:]]*[^[:blank:]]*[[:blank:]]*---[[:blank:]]*$/{s/.*\n//' -e 'b' -e '}' -e 'ba' -e '}' inputfile

Add the next user section:

sed "s/--- end/--- $username ---\ndata data data data\ndata data data data\n&/"

or

sed "/--- end/i--- $username ---\ndatadata data data\ndata data data data\n"

If your version of sed supports in-place changes, you can do:

sed -i ...

Otherwise, you'll have to use a temporary file:

sed ... inputfile > tmpfile && mv tmpfile inputfile

It's best to use a utility like mktemp or tempfile to create a temporary file and use the name provided.

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sed -e "/$username/" -e '{' -e ':a' -e 'N' -e '/\n--- [^[:blank:]] ---\$/{s/.*\n//' -e 'b' -e '}' -e 'ba' -e '}' inputfile i tried to use it and it makes an error:sed: -e expression #1, char 10: Missing command with $username changed to kasper and inputfile to my file usr_data –  kasper Feb 6 '11 at 22:38
    
@kasper: Sorry again, just see the edited version in my answer. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 6 '11 at 22:46
    
@Dennis: Well, there's no error this time, but the output is the same as input. i checked with diff. –  kasper Feb 6 '11 at 22:52
    
@kasper: Try it with the sample data you provided. Does it work with it? It works for me. Did you remove the backslash from before the dollar sign (it was an error on my part)? I edited my answer after I first replied to your comment. There were at least two corrections. Make sure you're using the latest. Does sed -n '/--- kasper ---/p' inputfile work? –  Dennis Williamson Feb 6 '11 at 23:01
    
@Dennis: sed -n '/--- kasper ---/p' inputfile is working, but still, after copying your command and pasteing it, it gives me the same file as input. –  kasper Feb 6 '11 at 23:12
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An awk solution for the 2nd part:

awk -v del="usr2" 'match($0,/^--- (.*) ---$/,a) {p = (a[1] != del)} p'

This turns the p flag off if the head matched the user to delete, otherwise it prints every line.

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Plain shell can handle this

Updated answer to include the second requirement...

#!/bin/sh

NEWUSER='John Doe'
NEWUSERDATA='how now brown cow'
REMOVEUSER='usr2'

state=COPY
while read x; do
  case "$state/$x" in
    *"/--- endline ---")
      echo --- $NEWUSER ---
      echo "$NEWUSERDATA"
      state=COPY
      ;;
    COPY/*)
      if [ "$x" == "--- $REMOVEUSER ---" ]; then
        state=REMOVE
      fi
      ;;
    REMOVE/---*)
      state=COPY
      ;;
  esac
  if [ $state != REMOVE ]; then
    echo "$x"
  fi
done

Usage is something like: sh newuser.sh < usertable.txt > newusertable.txt

By the way, there is an alternative style of writing shell scripts which I might call "gnu configure" format. In "alternative style" the main loop would be:

while read x; do
  case "$state/$x" in
    *"/--- endline ---")
      echo --- $NEWUSER ---
      echo "$NEWUSERDATA"
      state=COPY;;
    COPY/*)
      [ "$x" == "--- $REMOVEUSER ---" ] && state=REMOVE;;
    REMOVE/---*)
      state=COPY;;
  esac
  [ $state != REMOVE ] && echo "$x"
done
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1  
That answers question 1; it doesn't seem to address question 2. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 6 '11 at 22:06
1  
Yeah, this is pretty good solution to the first part. Please try the other one. –  kasper Feb 6 '11 at 22:55
    
Urk, you guys are right. NOW FIXED to meet both requirements. –  DigitalRoss Feb 6 '11 at 23:38
    
This script is very usefull for other purposes too. Will check it in practice tommorow, after a nice sleep. Thank you! –  kasper Feb 7 '11 at 0:14
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