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I'm using git 1.7.1 on Ubuntu 10.10 amd64, and I'm trying to extract the hash of my repository HEAD to use it in an automated version information that I compile into my project.

In the past, this always worked by using

git describe --tags

however, git is now throwing

fatal: No names found, cannot describe anything.

at me. Does anyone have a clue what that means?

Google showed only few hits and no solution.

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"I'm trying to extract the has of my repository HEAD" doesn't parse. –  nes1983 Feb 6 '11 at 22:16
    
@nes: The OP probably means hash. –  Jefromi Feb 6 '11 at 22:17
    
Do you actually want only the hash, or is the information put together by git describe useful to you? The most recent tag, and the number of intermediate commits, are much more human-readable than an SHA1. @nes: You might want to undelete your answer, since it could be exactly what the OP needs - it's hard to tell. –  Jefromi Feb 6 '11 at 22:27
    
@nes Of course I mean "hash" –  Philipp Feb 7 '11 at 11:37

2 Answers 2

If you want the id if your HEAD then you don't need describe, you should just use rev-parse.

git rev-parse HEAD

If you want an abbreviated hash you can use --short.

git rev-parse --short HEAD

If you want a "describe" to fall back to an abbreviated hash if it can't find any suitable tags, you can use --always.

git describe --always
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Yeah, that returns the hash, but what I acutally want is the abbreviated hash that is normally returned by git-describe which has like 8 characters or so –  Philipp Feb 7 '11 at 11:39
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@Philipp: git describe normally returns a tag object based string consisting of the tag name, a number of commits and and a suffix based on the hash. It doesn't normally return an abbreviated hash so I'm not quite sure what your asking for. –  Charles Bailey Feb 7 '11 at 12:27

It sounds like you're expecting git-describe to include the most recent tag and number of commits since that tag. However, the fatal: No names found message means you don't have any tags in your repository. You need to have at least one tag in the commit history in order for git describe to tell you the latest tag.

Just guessing, but perhaps you tagged a commit somewhere else, but never pushed the tag upstream (maybe you pushed the commit upstream, tagged it later, and didn't repush?). Now a new clone of your upstream is giving you this error (since it doesn't have any tag). If that's the case, you could try git push --tags from the repository that has the tag you want (where git describe is doing what you expect). Then do git pull on the repository that doesn't have the tag.

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