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I don't think they do, because delete uses the free() function, and replace just changes values, and doesn't make new nodes. I'm asking because I'm coming from Java and I'm new to memory allocation.

IntNodePtr delete(int i, IntNodePtr p) {
  /* End of list check */
  if(p == NULL)
    return NULL;

  /* Check if current node is the one to delete */
  if(p->myInt == i) {
    IntNodePtr temp;
    temp = p->next;

    free(p);
    return temp;
  }

  p->next = delete(i, p->next);
  return p;
}

IntNodePtr replace(int i, int j, IntNodePtr p) {
  if(p == NULL)
    return NULL;

  if(p->myInt == i)
    p->myInt = j;

  p->next = replace(i, j, p->next);
  return p;
}
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1  
Considering how you used both methods, they look fine to me. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 7 '11 at 2:24
    
Although it's perfectly legal to call your function delete in C, I'd strongly recommend renaming it to something else (such as delete_node) so that it can be called from C++ code. –  Adam Rosenfield Feb 7 '11 at 4:30

4 Answers 4

In C, we don't call allocated memory that is no longer used "garbage", but a "memory leak".

You only need to free memory that you have previously allocated using malloc. In this case, none of your functions call malloc, and hence they don't need to free anything. (Though the delete function looks like it is freeing memory allocated somewhere else in the program. That is fine too.)

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1  
Keep in mind that C APIs are notoriously irregular on ownership issues too. He may not directly allocate memory and still have to free it because an API he called returned some dynamically-allocated memory itself. –  JUST MY correct OPINION Feb 7 '11 at 2:47
    
"hence they don't need to free anything" is tempting me to downvote. –  Potatoswatter Feb 7 '11 at 3:30

In delete you free the object because, once the pointer is replaced, there will be no way to access it. All good there.

In replace objects are only modified in place. Nothing is created or destroyed so malloc and free are not involved.

Note that these functions may cause a stack overflow error if the list is too long. Also, replace always returns its argument p, so there is no need for it to return anything. Leaving a tail call at the end of the function in place of p->next = replace( … would (all but) eliminate the stack overflow risk. Recoding delete as a loop would likewise perhaps be somewhat safer.

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I agree with the removal of recursion. Never write recursive functions for recursion's own sake. In this particular program, it does two things: 1) slow the code down a lot, and 2) make it less readable. –  Lundin Feb 7 '11 at 10:31
  if(p->myInt == i) {
    IntNodePtr temp;
    temp = p->next;

    free(p);
    return temp;
  }

This code is questionable. What do you do with the returned pointer? To me, it seems as if you delete a node in the middle of the linked list without care for the previous "next pointer". After p is deleted, the previous next pointer will point at invalid memory. I.e. you cut off the list in the middle.

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In C" garbage" is generated when free is called, there is no "garbage collection" in C; unless it has been implemented -sorry if I am stating the obvious! So, delete will generate "garbage" - regarding replace your observation is correct.

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How does free generate garbage? I'm tempted to downvote this for being totally unhelpful, if not inaccurate. –  Chris Lutz Feb 7 '11 at 2:22
    
-1: I've stared at this answer for 2+ minutes and I still don't understand it. Garbage (AKA a memory leak) is what is generated when free is not called. I'm wondering if this "answerer" has a good grip on the English language. –  JimR Feb 7 '11 at 3:32
    
I think what the answer is trying to say is that once you free, the contents of that memory are now indeterminate and off limits -- as opposed to right before the free call when you had good valid memory -- and now after the free call the pointer points to garbage? (Although that's OK because you're just asking for it if you use pointers after your free them) –  user470379 Feb 7 '11 at 3:50
    
@user470379 - thanks @Chris,@JimR - yes I should have been careful while framing the answer –  Abhi Feb 7 '11 at 4:00

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